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SiJieun

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SiJieun

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Pangut

An entertainment-oriented nongak performance consisting of various acts such as playing rhythm patterns (jangdan), choreographed line formations (jinpuri), dance, and acrobatics, presented in a carefully thought-out prescribed order. The term pangut was first used in a book titled “Honam Nongak” (Nongak of the Honam Region) published in 1967. The book relates that concert-style nongak performances were featured in the nongak performed in the eastern (jwado, or left) and western (udo, or right) p

Korean Folk Arts

Ritual for Provincial Deity

Dodanggut is the term for the village rituals of Gyeonggi Province, held regularly in the beginning of the first lunar month or in spring or fall, aimed at bringing peace and good harvest to the community. Dodanggut is organized by the villagers, with a head host official, called hwaju or dangju, in charge of overseeing the preparations, and dodanggut is officiated by a shaman from outside the community. The purpose of this village ritual is to pray to Dodangsin (Provincial Deity), the village g

Korean Folk Beliefs

Shamanic Instruments

Muakgi is a term that refers to the wide range of musical instruments used in a shamanic ritual. Music accompanies almost all shamanic rituals, performed on janggu (hourglass drum), bara (small cymbals), piri (reed flute), daegeum (large bamboo flute, also called jeotdae), haegeum (two-stringed zither), kkwaenggwari (small gong), buk (small drum), seolsoe (bowl-shaped gong) and other instruments. In the northern parts of Gyeonggi Province, janggu, jing (gong), bara, piri, haegeum and daegeum are

Korean Folk Beliefs

Goyang Songpo Homigeori

A custom of farmers to relieve fatigue from farming and wish for a good harvest, originating from Baemgae Village in Daehwa-dong, IlsanSeo-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do Province. Homigeori traditionally means a custom of washing a homi (a short hoe) clean and hanging it by a flag after the last weeding of the farming year. Farmers would hold Homigeori on Chirwolchilseong (July 7th of the lunar calendar), or on or about Baekjung. Every homigeori is about sharing delicious food and enjoying each othe

Korean Folk Arts

Gwacheon Mudong Dapgyo Nori

A Korean folk game combining the Bridge Crossing Nori that wishes longevity and health during the night of Jeongwol Daeboreum with acrobatic performances to welcome King Jeongjo and his corps when they stop by and quarter in Gwacheon, Gyeonggi-do Province, on their way to the Hwaseong Fortress. Dapgyo Nori is a nationwide tradition where people cross over a bridge in a town during the night of Jeongwol Daeboreum (the first full moon of the lunar calendar) to wish for a rich harvest and a long he

Korean Folk Arts

Dari Segi Nori

A game intertwining two or more players by their legs while facing each other and removing the leg that is chosen by the end of a song sung by a particular player while counting their legs. The Dari Segi Nori is also referred to as Dari Ppopgi Nori (a leg-pulling game). This is a favorite indoor game among children. The purpose of this game is to make the last player, who was unable to get their leg free, “it, ” or give that player an additional penalty. To play this game, more than two children

Korean Folk Arts

Dukkeobijip Jitgi Nori

A game making cave-shaped houses by placing and patting wet dirt or sand over the back of one hand, and then slowly trying to remove it. Also called, Moraejip Jitgi Nori, this iconic folk game of Korea has children making houses with dirt or sand. First, the player places wet dirt or sand on the back of one hand, and then pats the dirt with the other hand to mold it into a solid structure. The patting takes patience and attention since the hand below dirt needs to be remain still throughout the

Korean Folk Arts

Hongbakssi

Round mirror-like metal plate attached on the back of the sangsoe, the lead small gong (soe or kkwaenggwari) player of a nongak (farmers’ music) troupe. The sangsoe, in many cases is dressed differently from the other musicians in order to stand out and lead the rest of the troupe. For example, he may wear a vest in a different color from that of the other percussionists and hongdongjigi (red overwear) with sleeves of multicolored stripes. Of his attire, hongbakssi is a shiny round mirror-shaped

Korean Folk Arts

Earth God Treading

Jisinbabgi is a communal ritual of going around the houses in the village to tread on the earth gods in different corners of the grounds, accompanied by farmers’ music, a rite that follows the ritual for village gods (dangsangut) held between Seol (Lunar New Year’s Day) and Jeongwoldaeboreum (Great Full Moon) to pray for peace and good fortune for the New Year. The ritual procedures aim at keeping in place the earth gods positioned in various corners of each home, and at appeasing the deities wi

Korean Folk Beliefs

Cheongju Nongak

Nongak performed in Sinchon-dong and Ji-dong in Cheongju, Chungcheongbuk- do Province that has been developed into an entertainment-focused form of nongak. Cheongju Nongak is a version of nongak performed in the central part of Chungcheongbuk-do. As nongak developed in areas where rice farming was active, Cheongju Nongak developed around the Miho plains, the granary of the Chungcheongbuk-do region. It declined somewhat during the Japanese colonial period, but after liberation, the nongak of Sinc

Korean Folk Arts

Gimpo Tongjin Durenori

A composite folk performance combining nongak (farmers’ music), farming songs, and mimicking of farming procedures presented by durepae (group that carries out communal farm work and performs nongak) that has been handed down in Tongjin, Gimpo, Gyeonggi-do Province. In Gimpo, adjacent to the Hangang River and Seomjingang River, rice paddy farming developed on the Gimpo plains, and consequently durepae were very active. They remained active until mid-1960s, but with the mechanization of farming t

Korean Folk Arts

Gapbigocha Nongak

Nongak (farmers’ music) handed down in the Ganghwado region, encompassing the rites performed while working in the fields. “Gapbigocha” was the old name of Ganghwado. It is the compound word of gapbi (Kor. 갑비, Chin. 甲比), which literally means “layers, ” “overlap, ” or “double, ” and gocha (Kor. 고차, Chin.古次), which means “cape, ” or “point.” Therefore, gapbigocha can be interpreted to mean “a village situated at the cape of a bifurcated sea or river.” Gapbigocha Nongak is mainly composed of nongs

Korean Folk Arts

Nongsapuri

A series of farming procedures mimicked, or acted out, by a group of performers to the accompaniment of nongak (farmers’ music) rhythms. Like entertainment-oriented nongak performances called pangut, nongsapuri is performed by a group to entertain an audience. It developed in a systematic way mostly in the northern part of Gyeonggi-do Province and the Yeongdong region, where nongak itself can be called nongsapuri nongak. In some parts of the Yeongnam region, nongsapuri is included as part of pan

Korean Folk Arts

Pyeongtaek Nongak

Nongak handed down in Pyeonggung-ri, Paengseong-eup in Pyeongtaek, which combines the nongak performed during farm work carried out by collective farm labor groups called dure in the Pyeongtaek region and the entertainment-based nongak performed in the southern part of Gyeonggi-do Province. Pyeongtaek Nongak was designated National Intangible Cultural Heritage No. 11-a in 1985. Thanks to the vast plains called Sosaetdeuri, agriculture thrived in the Pyeongtaek region and nongak likewise flourish

Korean Folk Arts
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