Authors

all : 1

RyuJongmok

11 count

RyuJongmok

11

Dongnae Jisinbapgi

A custom fighting off evil spirits for the well-being, rich harvest and wealth of the village and its community for the year based on the folk religion of Dongnae, Busan (Designated in 1977 as Busan Metropolitan City Intangible Cultural Property No. 4, ). Dongnae Jisinbapgi is performed by pungmuljaebi (a troupe playing farmer’s music) and japsaek (performers taking on various characters). The pungmuljaebi consists of around 20 performers, including two soejabis (seonsoe and jongsoe; the leading

Korean Folk Arts

Masan Nongcheong Nori

A folk game encompassing the work preparing for the main event, and the battle between two nongcheongs of Changwon (the former name of Masan), Gyeongsangnam-do Province. Masan Nongcheong Nori was originated from dure (farmers’ cooperative groups). Traditional Korean societies based on farming had various types of groups for cooperative work, and dure was the most popular form among them. The estimated time of origin of dure is the end of the eras of clan societies or tribal nations. Also, it is

Korean Folk Arts

Taboo Rope

Geumjul, or taboo rope, is a straw garland hung over a gate, in the entrance of an alley, around a divine tree (sinmok) or on the sauce jar terrace to keep out impurities. The garland is made of left-hand lay straw rope, tied with a number of symbolic items, which vary by function and occasion: When a son is born, a rope is hung over the two pillars of the gate of the house, with fresh pine branches (solgaji), pieces of wooden charcoal (sut), and red peppers (gochu); when a daughter is born, wit

Korean Folk Beliefs

Village Guardian Deity

Seonang is the guardian deity of a village, responsible for preserving the welfare and prosperity of the community, and for treating illnesses and eradicating bad fortune as well. The name Seonang is believed to have come from Sanwang (Mountain King), another name for the mountain deity Sansin, and its worship was aimed at using divine powers to protect the communal sites for hunting, farming and cattle-breeding in ancient societies. Built on these sites were altars made of stone stacks (nuseokd

Korean Folk Beliefs

Jwasuyeong Eobang Nori

A song sung by naval forces and fishermen when fishing in Suyeong-dong, Busan, while fishing for anchovies or recreating related songs. The understanding of Jwasuyeong Eobang Nori requires knowledge about huri, a traditional fishing method, comprised of Baehuri and Gathuri. Baehuri required fishermen to cast a fishing net into the water to make a circle around a school of fish and then pull both ends of the net, whereas Gathuri required fishermen to cast a fishing net at the starting shoreline a

Korean Folk Arts

Backyard God

Cheollyung is a household god believed to reside on the sauce jar terrace or other parts of the backyard of a house. Cheollyung is a deity similar in character to Teoju (Land Tutelary God), Sansin (Mountain God), Yongsin (Dragon God), Jangdoksin (Sauce Jar Deity) and other gods, worshipped as a guardian of peace in the home and for the children in the family. Worshipped mostly in South and North Jeolla provinces, this deity’s name is believed to be an altered transcription of Cheongnyong, meanin

Korean Folk Beliefs

Hand-Rubbing Ritual

Bison refers to a simple rite performed by rubbing one’s palms together to pray for a wish to come true or for a cure for a disease. The first syllable bi is a derivation of the verb bilda, “to pray, ” and son means “hand.” Variations of the term include sonbim and binyeom, in Jeju dialect. It is assumed that hand-rubbing is a gesture to make an appeal to the divine beings of the human fragility against higher forces of Nature. In the course of history, this humble act evolved into the complicat

Korean Folk Beliefs

Ritual for Village Guardian Post

Jangseungje is a ritual held in the process of erecting jangseung, or village guardian posts, or to worship these guardians and pray for good fortune and to chase away evil spirits. Rituals associated with village guardian posts are held on three different occasions: when felling the tree for carving the posts; to dedicate and bless the new posts with spiritual powers upon their erection; and for annual worship of the guardian posts held as part of dangsanje, the ritual for village gods. In many

Korean Folk Beliefs

Summer Solstice

Haji (Kor. 하지, Chin. 夏至, lit. summer reach) is the tenth of the twenty-four solar terms. It occurs between Mangjong (Kor. 망종, Chin. 芒種, Bearded Grain) and Soseo (Kor. 소서, Chin. 小暑, Minor Heat) and is some time in the fifth lunar month. On the Gregorian calendar, Haji falls around June twenty-second. The sun appears at its northernmost point (referred to as hajijeom (Kor. 하지점, Chin. 夏至點, summer solstice point)) on the ecliptic and its declination is greatest on this day. The meridian altitude of

Korean Seasonal Customs

Minor Heat

Soseo (Kor. 소서, Chin. 小暑, lit. Minor Heat) is the eleventh of the twenty-four solar terms. It comes between Haji (Kor. 하지, Chin. 夏至, Summer Solstice) and Daeseo (Kor. 대서, Chin. 大暑, lit. Major Heat). On the Gregorian calendar, Soseo falls around July fifth when the sun reaches the celestial longitude of 105°. As its name suggests, Soseo signals the beginning of the scorching summer heat. This period is marked by a high degree of humidity and a great deal of rain due to the seasonal rain front tha

Korean Seasonal Customs

Major Heat

Daeseo (Kor. 대서, Chin. 大暑, lit. Major Heat) is the twelfth of the twenty-four solar terms. It follows Soseo (Kor. 소서, Chin. 小暑, lit. Minor Heat) and precedes Ipchu (Kor. 입추, Chin. 立秋, lit. Beginning of Fall). Daeseo falls on the sixth lunar month and occurs around July twenty-third on the Gregorian calendar. On this day, the sun reaches the celestial longitude of 120°. This solar term marks the hottest period of the year and follows the end of the rainy season, prompting an old saying: “even the

Korean Seasonal Customs
<< 이전 1

1/1

>>