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ParkJintae

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ParkJintae

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Performance of Five Players

Ogwangdae (Kor. 오광대, Chin. 五廣大, performance of five players) is a mask dance originating in the southeastern part of Korea, South Gyeongsang Province. It is still performed in some areas of the province such as Sacheon (Gasan-ri, Chukdong-myeon), Jinju, Masan (Jaseon-dong), and Tongyeong. The play was known under various names in the past including ogwangdae nori (Kor. 오광대놀이), ogwangdae noreum (Kor. 오광대놀음), ogwangdae tal noreum (Kor. 오광대탈놀음), and ogwangdae tal nori (Kor. 오광대탈놀이). However, it is

Korean Seasonal Customs

Jangyeon Kkokdugaksigeuk

Puppet play from the Jangyeon area of Hwanghae-do Province. A puppet play handed down in the Jangyeon region of Hwanghae-do Province. This puppet play developed centered on Seoul until the 18th century, then thanks to lively activities of troupes of itinerant male entertainers (namsadangpae), it began to be spread throughout the country. Eventually, the play was localized in the Jangyeon region of Hwanghae-do Province and the Seosan region in Chungcheongnam-do Province. As performance of the pla

Korean Folk Arts

Byeokgolje Ssangnyong Nori

A custom consisting of a fight between a white dragon and a blue dragon, based on the Legend of Danya about the creation of Byeokgolje Reservoir. Byeokgolje Ssangnyong Nori was based on the Byeokgolje Reservoir (originally a region of Baekje), the reservoir with the longest documented history in Korea. It is related to rice farming and to a religious belief in the dragons of the Gimje and Mangyeong plains, the only plains of Korea that feature a full horizon. Also, it was developed into a play b

Korean Folk Arts

Manseokjung

Monk who is the main character in Manseokjung nori. Buddhist monk puppet, the main character in the Buddhist puppet play Manseokjung nori. Manseokjung, or Monk Manseok, is valuable material in masked dance-drama as the monk puppet is not a rod puppet called jangdugoeroe (Kor. 장두괴뢰, Chin. 杖頭傀儡, lit. puppet manipulated by wooden rods), but a string puppet called hyeonsagoeroe (Kor. 현사괴뢰, Chin. 縣絲傀儡, lit. puppet controlled by strings, or marionette). Rod puppets like those used in Kkokdugaksinoreum

Korean Folk Arts

Field Play

Deulnoreum (Kor. 들놀음, Chin. 野遊, lit. field play) is a traditional mask play held during the Great Full Moon Festival (the fifteenth of the first lunar month) in Dongnae-gu and Suyeong-dong of Nam-gu, both located in the Busan administrative area. In the past deulnoreum was generally the name used by the elderly and women in the area, to refer to the mask play, while the “learned people” and the younger people more oftenly referred to it as yaryu (Kor. 야류, Chin. 野遊). Both names mean “outdoor play

Korean Seasonal Customs

Field Play

Deulnoreum (Kor. 들놀음, Chin. 野遊, lit. field play) is a traditional mask play held during the Great Full Moon Festival (the fifteenth of the first lunar month) in Dongnae-gu and Suyeong-dong of Nam-gu, both located in the Busan administrative area. In the past deulnoreum was generally the name used by the elderly and women in the area, to refer to the mask play, while the “learned people” and the younger people more oftenly referred to it as yaryu (Kor. 야류, Chin. 野遊). Both names mean “outdoor play

Korean Seasonal Customs

Performance of Five Players

Ogwangdae (Kor. 오광대, Chin. 五廣大, performance of five players) is a mask dance originating in the southeastern part of Korea, South Gyeongsang Province. It is still performed in some areas of the province such as Sacheon (Gasan-ri, Chukdong-myeon), Jinju, Masan (Jaseon-dong), and Tongyeong. The play was known under various names in the past including ogwangdae nori (Kor. 오광대놀이), ogwangdae noreum (Kor. 오광대놀음), ogwangdae tal noreum (Kor. 오광대탈놀음), and ogwangdae tal nori (Kor. 오광대탈놀이). However, it is

Korean Seasonal Customs

Tongyeong Ogwangdae

Masked dance-drama from Tongyeong, Gyeongsangnam-do Province. This is a masked dance-drama handed down in Tongyeong, Gyeongsangnam-do Province. Preparations begin in the last month of the year and at New Year the event begins with jisinbabgi (lit. treading on the earth gods) to expel evil spirits. On the morning of Jeongwol Daeboreum the commander of the naval garrison (tongjesa) played magistrate and pretended to interrogate criminals. This was followed by pungmulnori (performance of farmer’s

Korean Folk Arts

Manseokjung nori

Mimed Buddhist puppet play. Buddhist puppet play performed in mime (Kor. 무언, Chin. 無言, lit. no words) form that features Monk Manseok (Manseokjung) and various animal characters. As a puppet play performed to celebrate Buddha’s birthday at temples and private homes Manseokjung nori has an important status in the history of Buddhist puppet theater in Korea. Until the early 1930s, Manseokjung nori used to be performed at temples or villages around Gaeseong in Gyeonggi-do Province. Thereafter its

Korean Folk Arts

Saja

Masked lion character. Lion character that appears in Buddhist dances, royal court dances and folk plays. This character is represented in masked dance-dramas by an actor wearing a lion mask. In Korea, Buddhist dance, court dance and folk dance feature a character called Saja (Kor. 사자, Chin. 獅子, lit. lion). In Buddhist dance, Saja appears in giak, a form of religious dance of Baekje, one of the ancient kingdoms of Korea. The shape, production methods, and decoration of the lion masks that appea

Korean Folk Arts

Hahoetal

Masks worn in Hahoe Byeolsingut Talnori. A mask (or masks) worn by the performers featured in byeolsingut held in Hahoe village. One of the Hahoe masks made of alder wood is Korea’s oldest wooden mask. Only the lion-shaped Juji is an animal mask, while all the other Hahoe masks are in the form of human faces. However, gaksital (bride’s mask) can be seen as a deity mask, representing the seventeen-year-old seonangsin (tutelary deity) found in legend. According to the legend, a seventeen-year-old

Korean Folk Arts
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