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NamSungjin

16 count

NamSungjin

16

Hwaetbulssaum

A game battling with torches between the children of neighboring villages on the evening of Jeongwol Daeborum. Hwaetbulssaum is typically conducted along with the Jwibul Nori (mouse fire game), Dalmaji (welcoming the moon), and Daljiptaeugi (burning of daljips) on the eve or on the evening of the Jeongwol Daeboreum (the first full moon of the lunar calendar). Hwaetbulssaum were often fought in mountainous rural areas, and they looked like real battle scenes at the height of performance, with the

Korean Folk Arts

Gamnae Gejuldanggigi

A variation of tug-of-war that has been passed down in Gamcheon-ri (Gamnae) of Bubuk-myeon, Miryang, Gyeongsangnam-do Province, where the team members hitch a rope, knotted in the shape of a crab, around the shoulders while facing opposite directions from each other, and then crawl forward tugging the rope. Gamcheon was a stream known for a good haul of crab, and the local residents used to fight amongst other for a good spot catching the crabs. The elders of the community would then step forth

Korean Folk Arts

Geunettuigi

A custom swinging back and forth on a board, hanging from a horizontal branch by two long ropes. According to Joseonui Hyangtoorak (The Folk Games of Joseon, published in 1936) by Murayama Jijun, swings were enjoyed by young women on Dano (festival of the 5th of the fifth lunar month) in throughout Joseon. Also, the game was enjoyed on Sawolchopail (Buddha’s Birthday) and/or Chuseok (the harvest festival) by not only young women, but young men as well. A swing consists of a board that hangs most

Korean Folk Arts

Namhae Seongu Jul Kkeutgi

A game of tug-of-war that wishes for a good harvest of crops and fish, and the well-being of the village in the Seongu village of Nam-myeon, Namhae-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do Province. Namhae Seongu Jul Kkeutgi is a kind of tug-of-war between two parts of the village: the northern part, which conducts a ritual to the upper Dangsan Shrine, and the southern part, which performs a ritual to the lower Dangsan Shrine. At first, children of the village collect straw from every house in the village to creat

Korean Folk Arts

Neolttwigi

A game taking turns jumping on two ends of a wooden board while the middle of the board is propped upward. Neolttwigi is one of the most common and active games for young females at the beginning of January. There is no definitive record about when it began. According to theory, its origin traces back to long ago. One theory suggests that this game was created for women who could not freely go outdoors to get a glimpse of the scenery, and more importantly, men walking the streets beyond the wall

Korean Folk Arts

Jinju Samcheonpo Nongak

Nongak featuring mock military procedures (gunsapuri) performed to pray for the welfare of the community and a plentiful harvest handed down in Jinju and Samcheonpo, Gyeongsangnam-do Province. Jinju Samcheonpo Nongak is representative of nongak from the Yeongnam region, centered around the western part of Gyeongsangnam-do. Jinju Nongak, featuring 12 acts (madang), is characterized by its nongsapuri and references to historical events. Events such as the battle of Jinju Fortress during the Japane

Korean Folk Arts

Cheongdo Chasan Nongak

Nongak handed down in Chasan-ri, Punggak-myeon, Cheongdo in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. Cheongdo Chasan Nongak is a form of nongak that developed from the cheongwanggi (Kor. 천왕기, Chin. 天王旗, lit. flag of the heavenly king) battle that was waged among various villages in Punggak-myeon, Cheongdo. Chasan-ri (Kor. 차산리, Chin. 車山里) is a village with a long history, known to be an ancient village of Silla. It is a typical farming village where its 130 households have relied solely on agriculture for livi

Korean Folk Arts

Madangbapgi

Madangbapgi refers to jisinbapgi, which literally means “treading on the earth gods, ” a rite performed to pray for protection of the home. Otherwise, it may refer to the specific part of the rite that takes place in the yard (madang). After the rite held to the tutelary gods of the village (danggut) between New Year’s Day and the first full moon day (15th day of the 1st lunar month), the local nongak troupe goes from house to house in the village to perform the rite of treading on the earth god

Korean Folk Arts

Seungnamdo Nori

A game traveling to famous locations on the board according to the number rolled on a die. Seungnamdo or Namseungdo means a diagram for traveling to scenic locations, translating to the object of Seungnamdo Nori to be for players to embark on a journey from a certain point and compete with one another to become the first player to return to the starting point after traveling to famous spots throughout the country. As with Jongjeongdo Nori, this game is an indoor game, as well, and with the prope

Korean Folk Arts

Gosan Nongak

Nongak (farmers’ music) passed down and performed in Daeheungdong, Suseong-gu, Daegu Metropolitan City. Originally named Naehwan-ri, Gosan-myeon in Gyeongsan, Daeheung- dong was incorporated into Daegu and became Naehwan-dong in 1981 when Daegu’s status was raised to a metropolitan city. In 2002, the name was changed to Daeheung-dong. This village was a typical rural community located along the road to Seoul and was called Gokgye (Kor. 곡계, Chin. 谷溪) from the Goryeo period. It was inhabited by pe

Korean Folk Arts

Haman Hwacheon Nongak

Nongak (farmers’ music) handed down in Hwacheon-ri, Chilbuk-myeon, Haman in Gyeongsangnam-do Province. Haman Hwacheon Nongak performed in Hwacheon-ri, Chilbuk-myeon, Haman in Gyeongsangnam-do Province, was designated Intangible Cultural Heritage No. 13 of Gyeongsangnam-do Province on December 23, 1991. The village of Hwacheon was originally called Yujeongri because of the thick grove of willows standing in front of the fields (yujeong meaning “willows by the water”). It was later named Hwacheon

Korean Folk Arts

Ssangnyuk

A game using fifteen game pieces for each person or team, along with two dice, to be the first to move one’s pieces to a certain place or remove all opponent’s game pieces from the game board. Ssangnyuk is a type of indoor game. It can be played all year round, but is mostly played at the beginning of the Lunar New Year, as well as during the holiday period of Chuseok, or on other days throughout the winter season. Ssangnyuk requires a ssangnyukpan (a game board), 30 game pieces, and two dice. T

Korean Folk Arts

Pokjungnori

A custom casting out evil spirits using loud sounds from burning unseasoned bamboo on the eve of the Lunar New Year. On the eve of the Lunar New Year, a fire is set in a yard, or side street, and bamboo sticks with nodes are put into the fire, making loud cracking sounds. This tradition is called Yojuk or Daebulloki (burning bamboo), and people commonly believed that the sound would startle and cast out any evil sprints settled within their homes to help welcome in a fresh New Year. The firecrac

Korean Folk Arts

Pungdeung Nori

A game heralding the start of a battle of lanterns between groups of students from neighboring village schools on the evening of the winter solstice by flying grand sky lanterns. The students of village schools, or seodangs, in Gyeongsangnam-do Province used to engage in deungssaums (lantern battles) on the evening of the winter solstice. A Deungssaum is a game between the students of neighboring village schools and is also referred to as Chorongssam. Students have a ritual for the lantern battl

Korean Folk Arts

Haman Nakhwa Nori

A custom using sticks made of charcoal powder played on the Buddha’s Birthday every year in Goehang Village in Haman, Gyeongsangnam-do Province. Haman Nakhwa Nori is assumed to have begun during the middle of the Joseon Period during the 17th century and also goes by Nakhwayu or Julbul Nori. It consists of enjoying and watching fireworks at night and was conducted to enhance the level of fun and excitement during boat riding, at a poetry reading, or at a lantern festival. The charcoal powder of

Korean Folk Arts

Omok

A game placing black and white game stones in turn to form an unbroken chain of five stones in a row on a Baduk board to win. The earliest record of Omok can be found in Hanseo, a Chinese history book in the 2nd century B.C. Books in the Han Dynasty (206 BC to 220 AD) refer to Omok as Gyeogo. However, this cannot be regarded as the true origin of Omok, as its origin is yet to be fully determined. It is assumed that Omok originated in China and spread through Korea to Japan. Omok means placing fi

Korean Folk Arts
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