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KimTaewoo

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KimTaewoo

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Ritual Table

Gutsang is the term referring to the table of sacrificial foods in a shamanic ritual. The make-up of a ritual table varies by the deity being worshipped, but is generally identical to that in a Confucian memorial rite, with the head or leg of a cow or pig added. The type and arrangement of the ritual table provide clues to the characteristics of the ritual and the deity being worshipped. The arrangement and the amount and quality of the sacrificial foods also provide information about the status

Korean Folk Beliefs

Ritual for Government Office Deity

Bugundangje refers to rituals held at shrines set up near or on the grounds of government offices in the capital or in the provinces during Joseon (1392-1910), rituals now observed in the Seoul area along the Han River. During Joseon, every government building in Seoul had a shrine where newly appointed officials held a rite, and which also served as the venue for annual rites on the first day of the tenth lunar month; this was a prototype of rituals referred to today as bugundangje and observed

Korean Folk Beliefs

Life Bridge

Myeongdari, a term that literally means, “life bridge, ” is a strip of fabric that serves as a marker of foster parenthood formed between a shaman and her follower (dangol), offered to the gods to pray for longevity. Myeongdari comprises a strip of white cotton cloth, skeins of thread and mulberry paper, the thread inserted into the folds of the cloth, which is folded up and wrapped with mulberry paper, and kept in a pile. This offering is made by parents to their regular shaman on the years the

Korean Folk Beliefs

Government Office Shrine

Bugundang referred to shrines set up near or on the grounds of government offices in the capital or in the provinces during Joseon (1392-1910), and in present times refers to village shrines observed in the Seoul area along the Han River. These government office shrines were also called bulgeundang (red shrine), bugunmyo (shrine for government office deity), or bugeundang (phallic shrine). In Joseon, bugundang was housed in tile-roofed buildings that measured one or two kan (1 kan=6.6 m²), locat

Korean Folk Beliefs

Government Office Deity

Bugun, or Government Office Deity, is a village tutelary god worshipped at government shrines or in shamanic rituals around the Seoul area. In Joseon, this deity was enshrined at bugundang, set up near or on the grounds of government offices in the capital or in the provinces. These shrines were also called bulgeundang (red shrine), bugunmyo, bugunsa (shrine for government office deity), or bugeundang (phallic shrine). In present times, Bugun is enshrined at village shrines in the Seoul area alo

Korean Folk Beliefs

Three-Pronged Spear

Samjichang is a three-pronged spear used as a prop in shamanic rituals. A shaman acquires her samjichang through four different routes: by inheritance from her spirit mother; by discovery while experiencing spirit sickness or during a possession ritual (naerimgut); by purchase; or by donation from followers. In the past, the spears were custom-ordered through blacksmiths but are now mostly bought ready-made at stores. Spears of different sizes are used for different functions. In rituals staged

Korean Folk Beliefs

Five-Colored Ribbons

Osaekcheon, meaning five-colored fabric and comprised of the colors red, green, blue, yellow and white, is worshipped in Korean folk religion as a sacred entity or offered in rituals as sacrifice. Five-colored ribbons are used as offerings for the village guardian deity Seonang; or as banners tied to bamboo staffs for the wind god ritual yeongdeunggosa or for worshipping the boat guardian deity Baeseonang; or for wiping the body of the patient in healing rituals (byeonggut). Osaekcheon is offere

Korean Folk Beliefs
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