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KimSuntae

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KimSuntae

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Gisebae

A tradition of ranked villages gathered together and bowing with a village flag to another village flag of a higher-ranking village on Jeongwol Daeboreum. Regarding the origin of Gisebae, there are two theories: one theory says that it was started by combining a harvest ceremony and a military custom in the ancient capital of Mahan (1 AD – 3 AD) and Baekje (18 BC – 660 AD); another argues that it was started by the Choi brothers in Jeongeup of Jeollabukdo Province. However, this has yet to be pr

Korean Folk Arts

Yonggi

A large flag with dragon design that serves as a symbol of the village at important village events. The yonggi, which literally means “dragon flag, ” is one of the farming flags (nogggi) featured in a nongak performance. It is so named because of the dragon design in the center of the flag, which is also called yongdanggi (Kor. 용당기, Chin. 龍堂旗, lit. dragon hall flag) or yongdaegi (Kor. 용대기, Chin. 龍大旗, lit. large dragon flag). In some cases, the Chinese character for yong 龍, meaning “dragon, ” is

Korean Folk Arts

Jinan Jungpyeong Nongak

Nongak (farmers’ music) handed down in Jungpyeong village, Seongsumyeon, Jinan in Jeollabuk-do Province. Jinan Jungpyeong Nongak belongs to the category of Honam Jwado Nongak, referring to the nongak performed in the northeastern part of Jeollabuk-do, including Jinan, Jangsu, and Geumsan. It is not known exactly when Jinan Jungpyeong Nongak started to be performed. But a survey and report published in 1967 states that Han Gyu-dong, lead small gong player (sangsoe) of Honam Jwado Nongak, “followe

Korean Folk Arts

Gisu

The person who holds a flag and leads the nongak (farmers’ music) troupe. Although the main responsibility of the gisu (Kor. 기수, Chin. 旗手, lit. flag bearer) is to lead the nongak troupe by holding a flag, he also plays a major role in flag games or flag battles. The number of gisu is decided by the number of different flags used by each nongak troupe, including the yongdaegi (large dragon flag), nonggi (farming flag), yeonggi (command flag), and danchegi (group flag). The average number of gisu

Korean Folk Arts

Yeonggi

Of the flags organized for nongak (farmers’ music), the command flag (yeonggi) is deployed at the front of a nongak troupe with the farming flag (nonggi) and leads the way or serves as a messenger. The flag bears the Chinese character 令 (Kor. yeong), meaning “command.” Although yeonggi is mentioned as one of the military flags in the book on strategy “Sokbyeongjangdoseol” (Kor. 속병장도설, Chin. 續兵將圖說, lit. Illustrated Manual of Military Training and Tactics) written in the 18th century, it is not ce

Korean Folk Arts

Nonggi

The flag representing a farming village, dure or nongak (farmers’ music) troupe. Nonggi (Kor. 농기, Chin. 農旗, lit. farming flag) is the flag that represents an individual farming village. The term nonggi is a generic one that applies to flags of varying names and forms used throughout the Korean peninsula. Nonggi is relatively large compared to other flags so that it be seen from a distance, and it expresses the power and status of the group that holds the flag. The name of the flag comes from the

Korean Folk Arts

Sindae

Sindae (Kor. 신대, Chin. 神竿, lit. god post) is one of the flags (Kor. 기, Chin. 旗) used in nongak. It is the physical manifestation of the village gods and serves as the divine post on which the spirits descend. The sindae is a symbolic object of Korean folk religion. The village spirit pole called seonangdae shows its identity in its name, as seonang means “village god.” The seonangdae is the original form of seonanggi, a flag used in nongak (farmers’ music), and represents the transformation of o

Korean Folk Arts

Seonangdaessaum

A folk game hitting long poles, called seonangdae, representing village deities, against each other to knock down or break the opponent’s poles to decide a winning village. There is no historical record about the origin of Seonangdaessaum, leaving any conjecturing to be based upon the origin of Seonangdae. Seonangdae is a flag, maintaining the function of a sindae (a pole of a god), and is used for shamanic rituals nationwide and for village Dongje (rituals for village deities) in Gyeongsang-do

Korean Folk Arts

Jeonju Gijeop Nori

A folk game using flags around the 15th of the seventh month of the lunar calendar, or Baekjung, in Jeonju, Jeollabuk-do Province, enjoyed among farmers’ cooperative groups. Jeonju Gijeop Nori is also called Yonggi Nori, which is a part of the Hapgutmaegi that was passed down from Ujeondeul and Nanjeondeul of Jeonju. The Hapgutmaegi is an entertaining event where residents from several villages get together and join farmers’ bands to celebrate Sulmegi on Beakjung, the 15th of the seventh month o

Korean Folk Arts

Yeoseong Nongakdan

Professional female nongak (farmers’ music) troupes that were founded for commercial purposes in the Honam region in the 1960s and 1970s, which have since held nongak performances across the nation. All women nongak troupes had their beginnings in the Namwon Yeonseong Nongakdan (Namwon Women’s Nongak Band) established in 1959 to raise funds for operation of the Namwon Gugakwon (Nanwon Gugak Center). Prior to this, a female nongak troupe consisting of 10 persons was introduced at the National Fol

Korean Folk Arts
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