Authors

all : 5

KimJun

4 count

KimJun

4

Boat Banner

Baetgi is a banner raised on a boat to pray for a big catch and safety on the boat. The banner generally comprises stripes of three or five colors and is called different names by region. Some banners serve simply as ornaments but most are religious, referred to as seonanggi, or guardian deity banner. They are also called gosagi, or ritual banner, because they serve as sacred entities that embody deities in village rituals. When setting out for a catch, the boat owner raises the boat banner by t

Korean Folk Beliefs

Straw Boat

Ttibae refers to a miniature straw boat sent out into the sea at the end of the big catch ritual pungeoje to prevent bad fortunes and to pray for a big catch. The term varies by region, including jipbae (straw boat), toesongbae (rejection boat), honbae (spirit boat). These ritualistic boats are usually featured in village rites in the coastal regions, in the final stage during which the boat is sent out into the sea. Wido ttibaegut (Straw Boat Ritual of Wido Island) is the most widely known amon

Korean Folk Beliefs

Fishing Ritual

Gaetje is a village ritual held to pray for a big catch and safety for the community. This ritual, practiced at seaside villages, mostly in the coastal regions of Jeolla Province, is also called dukje (banner ritual), pungeoje (big catch ritual), susinje (water god ritual), haesinje (sea god ritual) or yongwangje (dragon king ritual). Gaetje is held as part of the village ritual dang je or as a private ritual. While the main procedures of dangje are officiated formally by elderly male ritual off

Korean Folk Beliefs

Boat Ritual

Baegosa is a worship ritual to pray for a big catch and safety on a boat. This ritual is held privately by boat owners to worship the boat guardian deity Baeseonang, or as part of communal rituals like pungeoje or dangje. As a private ritual, baegosa is observed on seasonal holidays, among which the biggest is held on Jeongwoldaeboreum (Great Full Moon) on the fifteenth day of the first lunar month. It is also held when a new boat has been purchased or constructed; when setting out for a catch;

Korean Folk Beliefs

KimJungeun

4 count

KimJungeun

4

Husband-Awaiting Rock

Mangbuseok legends narrate the story of a faithful wife who stands waiting on a hill, awaiting a husband who does not return, until she turns into a rock. The most widely known among mangbuseok legends is that of the husband-awaiting rock on Chisul Mountain Pass, about the wife of Bak Je- sang, a loyal subject of Silla during the reign of King Nulji, which transmitted in both written and oral forms. In the tale, when the husband is sent out to sea on a ship, the wife climbs a tall mountain ridge

Korean Folk Literature

Chisul Mountain Pass

The legend of Chisullyeong narrates the story of Bak Je-sang, who went to Japan at the order of Silla’s King Nulji in 402 to rescue the king’s brother, and upon getting captured by the Japanese, maintained his loyalty and died. Chisullyeong was the mountain pass where Bak’s wife awaited him until she turned into a rock. King Mulji sought to bring back his two brothers, Mihae and Bohae, who were being held hostage in Japan and Goguryeo, respectively. Bak Je-sang was sent on the mission to Gogurye

Korean Folk Literature

Boy Groom With a Mature Heart

This tale narrates the story of an older bride who scorned and belittled her younger groom, but when the groom covered up for her wrongdoing to protect her from her mother-in-law, grew to respect him. A nineteen-year-old maiden wed a nine-year- old boy. When the boy groom nagged the bride to give him crispy rice instead of the steamed rice that she served him, the bride got upset and carried him to the roof, leaving him there. His mother asked him what he was doing there and he answered that he

Korean Folk Literature

Wife of Wit and Intelligence

This tale narrates the story of a local clerk’s wife, whose beauty captivated the magistrate and when he proposed a riddle contest with aims to steal her away from her husband, the wife uses her wit to triumph over the magistrate. A new magistrate arrived to serve his post and learned of the beauty of the local clerk’s wife. Wanting the wife for himself, the magistrate proposed a contest to the clerk. He said he would wager a large amount of money and ordered that the clerk wager his wife, which

Korean Folk Literature

KimJungheon

4 count

KimJungheon

4

Saseol

The whole range of song lyrics and texts used in nongak, including the songs sung by the troupe during madangbapgi (treading on the earth gods), the chants for the gosa rite (Kor. 주사, Chin. 呪辭, lit. spoken prayer), and the songs for big entertainment-based nongak performances (pangut). Saseol can be divided into the songs for the gosa rite, the chants shouted during the rites performed at different parts of the house such as the well, the front gate, kitchen, and crock terrace, and those designe

Korean Folk Arts

Jinpuri

Varied ways of forming lines of movement which make up the choreographed sequences that the percussionists in nongak (farmers’ community music, dance and rites) follow throughout a performance. The most basic jinpuri (file formation) of nongak is the circular formation in which performers move in a circle counterclockwise. Generally, jinpuri begins with a circle and is followed by various other formations, and finally ends in a circle again. The circle dance is a typical dance format originating

Korean Folk Arts

Geollippae

A nongak (farmers’ music) troupe specializing in geollipgut. Nongak can be classified into three types depending on developmental phases: village nongak (nongak performed to pray for the well-being of a village), geollipnongak (nongak for fundraising purposes), and pojanggeollipnongak (nongak performed to earn a living). Village nongak, which is performed as part of a rite for a village or as a means of assistance, is carried out by a troupe whose members are selected from the residents of the v

Korean Folk Arts

Namwon Nongak

Nongak (farmers’ music) handed down centered on the Namwon region in Jeollabuk-do Province. Namwon Nongak as handed down today refers to Namwon dogumulgut from Ongjeong-ri, Geumji-myeon in the Namwon region. Dogumulgut was a simple village nongak, but Ryu Hanjun, a lead small gong player (sangsoe) developed it into a form of geollipnongak (performed for fundraising purposes). Ryu had learned a more developed professional geollip style of nongak from a famous small gong player, Jeon Pan, who used

Korean Folk Arts

KimJungkyung

1 count

KimJungkyung

1

Carp Returns Favor

This tale narrates the story of man who saves the life of a carp, who turns out to be Yongwang (Dragon King) or his son or grandson, for which the man is rewarded. The narrative of a dragon returning a favor he received dates back to “Tale of Geotaji” in Samgungnyusa (Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms) and “Tale of Jakjegeon” in Goryeosa (History of Goryeo), which have been transmitted in myriad variations throughout history. In the Korean folk tradition, the carp is a dragon in transformation a

Korean Folk Literature

KimJunhyung

5 count

KimJunhyung

5

Wish of Three Women

This carnal tale tells the story of three women revealing their sexual desires through words and action, a narrative formed as an act of resistance against the Neo-Confucian doctrines of late Joseon. To a household of three women—mother-in-law, daughter-in-law, and daughter—a salt vendor came visiting one day. The day was getting dark, and the salt vendor asked if he could spend the night, but the three women refused. The salt vendor pleaded again, saying a tiny corner would do, and the three wo

Korean Folk Literature

Song Ik-pil

This legend narrates the friendship between two of Joseon’s influential Confucian scholars Song Ik- pil (1534-1599; pen name Gubong) and Yi I (1536- 1584; pen name Yulgok), based on anecdotes surrounding Song, a central strategist among the Seoin (Westerners) faction of Joseon’s Confucian literati. Song and Yi were very close and after Yi’s death in 1584, the attacks from the Dongin (Easterners) faction were concentrated on Song. The tales are documented in various collections including Gyeseoja

Korean Folk Literature

Seeing Oneself in the Mirror for First Time

This tale depicts the foolish behavior of country folks encountering the mirror for the first time. The narrative is based on Buddhist scripture, and there are various different oral and written versions, the latter documented in Hong Man-jong’s (1643-1725) Myeongyeopjihye (Calendar Collection of Humor) as well as other books. A wife asks her husband to get her a comb as he sets out to Seoul on business. There was a half- moon in the sky, and the wife pointed to the moon to explain what a comb l

Korean Folk Literature

Tales from Gyeseo

Gyeseoyadam is a book of folk tales collected by an unknown editor. The collected tales are largely from Gimunchonghwa (Assorted Collection of Tales Read and Heard), with parts excerpted from Gyeseojamnok (Collection of Miscellany by Gyeseo), edited by Yi Hui-yeong, pen name Gyeseo, in 1828. The exact date of the publication of Gyeseoyadam is unknown, but is assumed to have succeeded Gimunchonghwa, compiled between 1833 and 1869. The earliest edition of the book that remains today is the one in

Korean Folk Literature

Shield Against Languor

Eomyeonsun is a collection of droll tales compiled by Song Se-rim (1479-1519) in early Joseon. Song Se-rim was a young man of exceptional intelligence who passed the state examinations for civil service at the age of twenty-three, but illness sent him to retire from public office and compile Eomyeonsun. The book was first published as a wooden type edition by Song’s younger brother Song Se-hyeong, but this edition does not remain today. The two-volume book comprises eighty- two tales, with an in

Korean Folk Literature
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