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KimDaesook

10 count

KimDaesook

10

Dutiful Son Who Healed His Mother

This tale narrates the story of a dutiful son who cures his mother’s illness, through devoted filial piety, which no renowned physicisn could heal. A long time ago there lived two brothers, the older of which was Bian Que, the most renowned physician of his time. But when their mother fell ill, not even this oustanding doctor could cure her. The younger brother, who was a devoted and dutiful son, travelled to distant lands to find a cure, carrying his mother on his back. One day while climbing a

Korean Folk Literature

Origin of God of Destiny Samgong

The shamanic myth“Samgongbonpuri ”narrates the origins of the god of destiny (jeonsangsin) and is recited as part of keungut (grand ritual) on Jeju Island. Once upon a time, there lived a male beggar in the upper village and a female beggar in the lower village. The two met on the street and lived together, earning a living as hired hands and giving birth to three daughters: When the first daughter was born a villager brought them steamed rice in a silver bowl, so the girl was named Eunjangagi (

Korean Folk Literature

Myth of Scholar Sukyeong and Maiden Aengyeon

The shamanic myth“ Sugyeongrangaengyeonnang singa, ”recited as part of illness rituals (byeonggut) performed across the Hamheung region in South Hamgyeong Province, tells the story of Scholar Sukyeong and Maiden Aengyeon. Marriage was arranged between fifteen-year- old Scholar Sukyeong and fourteen-year-old Maiden Aengyeon, after three proposals made to Master Mother and Master Father, which secured half - permission, and flowers blooming on this side and that bowing their heads to each other, w

Korean Folk Literature

Snail Bride

The tale“ Ureonggaksi” narrates the story of a man who marries a maiden who came from a snail shell, but who loses her after breaking a taboo. Narratives about auspicious snails have been documented in China since ancient times, included in Jiyiji (Collection of Strange Stories) under the title “Snail Bride” and in excerpted from Shoushenhouji (Addition to Records of the Strange), compiled by Deng Yuanzuo sometime between 365 BCE and 474 CE. A long time ago there lived an old bachelor who supp

Korean Folk Literature

Dutiful Son Finds Ripe Persimmons in Summer

This tale of filial piety narrates the story of a devoted and dutiful son who succeeds in finding, for his mother, a fruit that is not in season. A mother who had long been ill and bed- ridden craved for soft ripe persimmons, but it was summer and there was no way for her dutiful son to acquire it. On his way back from the marketplace late at night, the son encountered a tiger, which told him to get on its back and took him to a house, where an ancestral memorial service was being held. The offe

Korean Folk Literature

Butcher’s Daughter Born With Good Fortune

This tale emphasizes the belief that good fortune relies on individual fate and not social class, and can also be supplemented through marriage. A long time ago, there lived in Seoul a state councillor who had a son as an only child. The councillor, who was gifted in physiognomy, could tell that his son was born with the fate of a beggar. So he travelled the country and found a lowly butcher’s daughter who was born with good fortune to be his daughter-in-law. After the councillor’s death, howeve

Korean Folk Literature

Owner of My Own Fortune

This tale narrates the story of a daughter who is expelled by her father when she tells him that she is the creator of her own fortune, and meets a poor man but acquires wealth with her ability to find gold, and later reunites with her father and is accepted. Its plot structure is similar to those of the legend of Princess Pyeonggang, documented in the chapter “Ondal” of Samguksagi (Record of the Three Kingdoms), the legend of Princess Seonhwa in the section “Muwang” in Samgungyusa (Memorabilia

Korean Folk Literature

Husband Turns Wife Into Dutiful Daughter-in-Law

This narrative tells the story of a husband who uses his wit to transform his wife who is disrespectful to his parents into a dutiful daughter-in-law. This narrative can be categorized into two types: The first type can be summed up as “Fattening Up the Father-in-Law to Be Sold.” There was a husband and wife who lived with the husband’s widowed father. The husband noticed his wife treating his father badly, and his father would complain to him, the relationship worsening day by day and the house

Korean Folk Literature

Dutiful Daughter-in-Law Offers Worm Soup

This tale narrates the story of a daughter-in-law who, faced with poverty, serves her mother-in-law worm soup, which in the end helps the mother-in-law recover her vision. Tales about filial piety and food have a long tradition in Korean folk literature. “Dongjasam (Little Boy Insam)” narrates the story of a couple who sacrifice their young boy to cure one of their parents’ illness, to learn that the boy they sacrificed is sansam (wild ginseng). There is also the tale of a husband who hollers at

Korean Folk Literature

Fortune Tale

Haengundam, or fortune tales, narrate stories of unfortunate characters who by chance acquire good fortune. Fortune tales enjoy a long tradition in both oral and written transmission, and some examples include, “Stone Stack, Rice Stack, ” “Golden Ruler, ” “Three Pieces of Straw Rope, ” “Tiger Eyelash, ” “Man Who Became a Kin of Bak Mun-su, ” and “Royal Seal Returned.” The protagonists are men who are young, poor and/or disadvantaged, but do not possess the desire or plan to change their fortune,

Korean Folk Literature
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