Authors

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JungHyungho

21 count

JungHyungho

21

Sinjubu

Oriental doctor who performs acupuncture in sandaenori performances. Oriental doctor, a character who appears in the acupuncture act, or chimnori, in sandaenori handed down in the central part of the country. Sinjubu feels the pulse of the sons of Meokjung, the depraved monk, and saves them with acupuncture. Sinjubu (Kor. 신주부, Chin. 新主簿) is an acupuncturist who appears in Yangju Byeolsandaenori, Songpa Sandaenori, and Toegyewon Sandaenori. This oriental doctor character appears in the chimnori (

Korean Folk Arts

Eolleun

A traditional magic performance featuring a troupe of traveling artists performing unbelievable tricks that require a sleight of hand and other sorts of techniques. Eolleun is a traditional Korean word referring to magical acts that have been passed down among traveling artists troupes, which are referred to as hwansul (magic arts) or hwanhui (dreamlike tricks) in literature. A performer accomplishes seemingly impossible feats through a sleight of hand, amid the use of various tools or animals.

Korean Folk Arts

Masangjae

A series of acrobatic movements performed on running horses, including standing upright, headstands, hanging on the side, and moving from one side to another. Masangjae refers to a series of acrobatic movements performed on running horses, while along with Gyeokgu (Korean polo), Masangjae is generally considered a kind of equestrian martial arts. Despite an unknown time of origin, it is assumed that Masangjae has a considerably long history given the fact that horses were already used in Korea d

Korean Folk Arts

Korean Seesaw

Neolttwigi (Kor. 널뛰기, lit. jumping on a board) refers to seesawing, a traditional entertainment practiced mainly by women during the Lunar New Year season. A large rectangular board is supported in its middle by a round hay bundle and two players take turns pushing hard on their end of the board with their feet in order to make the other end spring up. Neolttwigi is also called dappan (Kor. 답판, Chin. 踏板), dopan (Kor. 도판, Chin. 跳板), chopanhui (Kor. 초판희, Chin. 超板戱) or panmu (Kor. 판무, Chin. 板舞). It

Korean Seasonal Customs

Yeonggam

Old man who is Halmi’s husband in masked dance-dramas. An old man who is the husband of Halmi and a symbol of patriarchal society. He criticizes his wife regarding the care of their children and brings home a concubine, who confronts Halmi, which in the end leads to Halmi’s death. Yeonggam (Kor. 영감, lit. old man) appears in the last act of gamyeongeuk (masked dance-dramas) with Halmi, causing conflict over family issues. Minor quarrels between the couple, responsibility for child-rearing, and co

Korean Folk Arts

Wanbo

One of the eight depraved monks in sandaenori performances. One of the eight depraved monks (Meokjung) who leads the other depraved monks and Omjung in the yeombulnori act, chimnori (acupuncture) act, Aesadangnori (dance of Aesadang) act, and pagyeseungnori (dance of the apostate monk) act in sandaenori performances. In Yangju Byeolsandaenori, Wanbo (Kor. 완보, Chin. 完甫) appears as the leader of eight Buddhist monks and approaches the other monks to ask their true identities. Meokjung discloses th

Korean Folk Arts

Korean Polo

Gyeokgu (Kor. 격구, Chin. 擊毬, lit. ball striking) is a traditional sport similar to modern polo in which players mounted on horseback drive a mogu (Kor. 모구, Chin. 毛毬, lit. wooden ball) into a gumun (Kor. 구문, Chin. 毬門, ball gate) using a bat called a jangsi (Kor. 장시, Chin. 杖匙, lit. stick-spoon). This sport originated in Persia, but came to Korea via Tang China (618-907) where it became very popular. In the beginning of the Goryeo dynasty (918-1392), gyeokgu was played exclusively by members of the

Korean Seasonal Customs

Baduk

A two-player game taking turns to place black stones and white stones on a wooden board with a 19 x 19 grid to see who can occupy the most territory to win. Also called Wongi or Hyeokgi, Baduk originated in China and made its way to Goguryeo, becoming a hobby among the upper class. Given that Emperor Shun of ancient China taught Baduk to his son, Baduk retains a very long history, while Baduk boards used during the later Han Period have also been discovered. According to Gudangseo (the Old Book

Korean Folk Arts

Dokki

Son of Sinharabi and brother of Dokkinui in sandaenori performances. Son of Sinharabi, a character who appears in sandaenori masked dance-dramas. Dokki steals money from his father and runs away from home. Upon the death of his mother, Miyalhalmi, he returns home to hold the funeral with his sister, Dokkinui. Dokki is a character who appears in the Sinharabi and Miyalhalmi act of Songpa Sandaenori, Yangju Byeolsandaenori, and Toegyewon Sandaenori. Dokki, the son of Sinharabi and Miyalhalmi, ran

Korean Folk Arts

Dokkinui

Daughter of Sinharabi and sister of Dokki in sandaenori performances. Daughter of Sinharabi, a character who appears in sandaenori masked dancedramas. Dokkinui leads a poor and solitary life after the death or disappearance of her husband. Upon the death of her mother, Miyalhalmi, she holds the funeral with her brother, Dokki. Dokkinui is a character who appears in the Sinharabi and Miyalhalmi act of Yangju Byeolsandaenori, Songpa Sandaenori, and Toegyewon Sandaenori. (In Songpa Sandaenori, the

Korean Folk Arts

Jultagi

A performance of tightrope-walking by an acrobat or a jester. Jultagi (tightrope walking) is performed by an acrobat walking on a rope hung high between two poles, boasting diverse skills using the hands and feet, while chatting and singing back and forth with a jester on the ground. Jultagi dates back to the Late Han Dynasty of China, however remains unclear when the game was introduced to Korea. There are two kinds of Jultagi: Gwangdae Jultagi and Eoreum (or Joseon) Jultagi. Gwangdae Jultagi i

Korean Folk Arts

Chukguk

A football game using a leather ball. Chukguk shares some characteristics with the modern version of football, where players kick the ball into a net. Chukguk is assumed to have been introduced from China, before becoming a widespread phenomenon during the Goguryeo Period, according to the records in the Chinese Book of Tang, which describes how people at the time were good at playing Chukguk. The variation of the game popular during the Goguryeo Period was defined by predominately fierce contes

Korean Folk Arts

Meokjung

Depraved monk appearing in masked dance-dramas. A depraved monk who leads a vulgar life although he is a Buddhist monk and ridicules his teacher, Nojang. Meokjung introduces himself as a Buddhist monk, but his speech and behavior is vulgar. In addition, he enjoys singing and dancing and seduces women while playing the beopgo (Buddhist drum). And when Meokjung finds out the identity of Nojang (old monk), he makes fun of him by likening him to an animal or an object. Such features of the character

Korean Folk Arts

Sandaenori

Masked dance-drama originating in Seoul. A type of masked dance-drama that has been passed down in Seoul and its suburbs. Etymologically, the name sandaenori is derived from an outdoor makeshift stage called sandae (Kor. 산대, Chin. 山臺, lit. mountain platform) and from the music and dance that were performed on that stage, which began to be built in the Goryeo period. As the practice of building sandae was abolished in the latter half of the Joseon Dynasty, only talnori (masked dance-drama) spread

Korean Folk Arts

Yangju Byeolsandaenori

Sandaenori-type masked dance-drama from the central part of Korea. One of the major types of sandaenori that was formed in the central region of Korea some 200 years ago under the influence of bonsandaenori performed in Seoul. Yangju Byeolsandaenori is based on a type of masked dance-drama called bonsandaenori performed in the Seoul region, and was re-presented in the local area in the 18th to mid-19th centuries. It is known that Yangju invited bonsandaenori troupes to perform there in the earl

Korean Folk Arts

Hahoe Byeolsingut Talnori

Masked dance-drama performed in Hahoe Village, Andong. Masked dance-drama derived from shaman rites to the village guardian deity (seonanggut), a component of the byeolsingut, a large-scale communal village rite, performed in Hahoe, a clan village of the Ryu clan from Pungsan. It was carried out by performers of different family names. Hahoe Byeolsingut Talnori dates back to the Goryeo Dynasty and is the oldest of the masked dance-dramas surviving into the present. It emerged naturally in the G

Korean Folk Arts

Jain Palgwangdae

Masked dance-drama from the Jain area in Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. Masked dance-drama performed at the Dano festival on the fifth day of the fifth lunar month in the Jain area of Gyeongsan, Gyeongsangbuk-do Province. Jain Palgwangdae (Kor. 자인 팔광대, Chin. 慈仁八廣大, lit. eight clowns of Jain) is performed as an additional entertainment in the form of masked dance-drama following a rite to commemorate General Han at Gyeongsan Jain Danoje (village ritual and festival held at Dano in Jain). After Jain P

Korean Folk Arts

Aesadang

Daughter of Waejangnyeo; a silent character in sandaenori performances. Daughter of Waejangnyeo, appearing in sandaenori handed down in the central part of the country. Aesadang, a silent character with no lines, is paid to attend on Meokjung, a depraved Buddhist monk, and is sexually harrassesd when she plays the Buddhist drum, beopgo. Aesadang refers to a young female itinerant entertainer (yeosadang) as opposed to a male itinerant entertainer (namsadang). The name and actions of Aesadang, who

Korean Folk Arts

Halmi

Old woman who is the wife of Yeonggam in masked dance-dramas. Halmi, a character that symbolizes an old and infertile woman, is the wife of Yeonggam (old man) in traditional masked dance-dramas. She ends up dying from the trials of raising her children without the aid of her husband when he is away from home and domestic conflict with her husband’s concubine. Halmi (lit. old woman) is a very atypical character in masked dance-drama. She appears with her bare belly exposed, performing a bold bott

Korean Folk Arts

Podobujang

Young policeman who clashes with the feeble old scholar Saennim over a woman. Young policeman, a character who appears in the act of the feeble scholar Saennim. Podobujang is a physically strong young man who clashes with Saennim as he flirts with Somu, Saennim’s young concubine. Podobujang appears in Yangju Byeolsandaenori, Songpa Sandaenori, and Toegyewon Sandaenori to seduce Somu, Saennim’s concubine. In Yangju Byeolsandaenori, Saennim walks along in wobbly steps with his young concubine Somu

Korean Folk Arts

Waejangnyeo

Tavern owner, who is accompanied by her daughter Aesadang. Tavern owner, a character who always appears accompanied by her daughter Aesadang. She sells liquor to Meokjung, a depraved monk, or makes her daughter attend on him. Originally, Waejangnyeo refers to a woman who is of large build and commits brazen acts without hesitation. Therefore, in gamyeongeuk (masked dance-drama) Waejangnyeo is portrayed as the tavern owner who forces a young female performer (yeosadang) to attend to Meokjung in r

Korean Folk Arts
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