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JooYoungha

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JooYoungha

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Watery Radish Kimchi

Dongchimi (Kor. 동치미) is a type of kimchi made from large pieces of white radish matured inside a full jar of salted water. In the section on the eleventh lunar month in the “Dongguk Sesigi (Kor. 동국세시기, Chin. 東國歲時記, A Record of Seasonal Customs in Korea, 1849), the dish is listed under the name dongchim, or kimchi made with small radish roots. The name dongchimi is derived from the Sino-Korean character-based name, dongchim (Kor. 동침, Chin. 冬沈). Some books of the Joseon Period (1392-1910) also ref

Korean Seasonal Customs

Flower Petal Pancakes

Hwajeon (Kor. 화전, Chin, 花煎, flower petal pancakes) are made by cooking thin, round shaped pieces of glutinous rice dough over an oiled pan and placing the petals of seasonal flowers on the top of the pancake. This type of pancake is also referred to as kkotjijimii (Kor. 꽃지지미) or kkotbukkumi (Kor. 꽃부꾸미). These cakes were often used as part of decorative piles of cakes on ritual altars for exorcism rites or memorial services. In spring, hwajeon are made with azalea petals (dugyeonhwajeon, Kor. 두견화

Korean Seasonal Customs

Steamed Rice

Me is an honorific used to refer to rice served on the ritual table as sacrificial offering. The term is used for rice served in front of the spirit tablet in Confucian memorial rites, and also for rice on the offerings table in village rituals and other shamanic rites as well. Ritual rice is generally served in a ceramic rice bowl, and the term can vary by container: In village rituals in Gangwon Province, for instance, rice served in a brass pot called saeong, is called saeongme, and rice serv

Korean Folk Beliefs

Dumpling Soup

Manduguk (Kor. 만두국) is a soup with dumplings made from various ingredients such as minced meat, tofu and vegetables that are wrapped in a thin dough. The food is known to have originated from China although Chinese dumplings are called jiaozi (Kor. 교자, Chin. 餃子) while mantou (a cognate to the Korean word mandu, Kor. 만두, Chin. 饅頭) refers to a steamed bun with no fillings. Korean dumplings are divided into several types according to the ingredients used for the filling and the wrapping; wheat mand

Korean Seasonal Customs

Dog Meat Soup

Gaejangguk (Kor. 개장국, lit. dog meat soup) is the name of a dish made by boiling dog meat in a soup flavored with fermented soybean paste and various spicy ingredients. It is one of the foods consumed on Sambok (Kor. 삼복, Chin. 三伏, Three Dog Days), the three hottest days in the sixth and seventh lunar months. Dog meat soup, along with other seasonal dishes such as gyesamtang (Kor. 계삼탕, ginseng chicken soup) and patjuk (Kor. 팥죽, red bean porridge), is considered to be helpful in coping with the sum

Korean Seasonal Customs

Red Bean Porridge

Patjuk, or red bean porridge, is a dish served on Dongji (Winter Solstice), and also offered as a sacrificial food or sprinkled in an act of sorcery to keep out bad fortune. Patjuk is cooked by boiling red beans in water, after which the beans are crushed, then strained. Rice is added to the water to make porridge. The practice of eating red bean porridge dates back to late Goryeo (918-1392), when the Chinese book Jinchu suishiji (Festivals and Seasonal Customs of the Jing-Chu Region) was introd

Korean Folk Beliefs

Rice with Leftovers

Goldongban (Kor. 골동반, Chin. 骨董飯) is a dish made with leftovers, eaten on Seotdal Geumeum (Kor. 섣달그믐, Lunar New Year’s Eve). The idea is that families must get rid of all their leftovers before the year draws to an end. Mixing various ingredients with rice results in a dish similar to bibimbap (Kor. 비빔밥), which is consumed on the last day of the lunar year. Goldongban is described in the “Gudong Shisanshuo” (Kor. 골동십삼설, Chin. 骨董十三說), a book written by a Ming-Chinese author by the name of Dong Qic

Korean Seasonal Customs

Yudu Noodles

Yudumyeon (Kor. 유두면, Chin. 流頭麵, lit. Yudu noodles) is a festival dish prepared to celebrate Yudu (Kor. 유두, Chin. 流頭, Water Festival of the sixth lunar month). One finds a record of consuming yudumyeon on the day of Yudu in the “Dongguk Sesigi” (Kor. 동국세시기, Chin. 東國歲時記, A Record of Seasonal Customs in Korea, 1849). The book also records that, “Yudumyeon are little balls of dough that often come in five colors. People put three balls on a string and carry or hang them on a door post to repel evil

Korean Seasonal Customs

Rice Cake Soup

Made by boiling slices of long, cylindrical rice cakes in a clean meat stock, tteokguk (Kor. 떡국), or rice cake soup, is served to all family members as a special festival meal for the Lunar New Year’s Day. In a 19th-century book on Korean festivities, “Dongguk Sesigi” (Kor. 동국세시기, Chin. 東國歲時記, A Record of Seasonal Customs in Korea), the soup appears under the names of baektang (Kor. 백탕, Chin. 白湯, lit. white soup, as the color of the rice cake flakes is white) and byeongtang (Kor. 병탕, Chin.

Korean Seasonal Customs

Ear-Sharpening Liquor

Gwibalgisul (Kor. 귀밝이술, lit. ear-sharpening liquor) is a rice wine drunk before breakfast on the Great Full Moon Festival Day (the fifteenth of the first lunar month). People in traditional Korea believed that drinking gwibalgisul on this day and at this precise hour would improve one’s hearing. Gwibalgisul is also known under Sino-Korean names including imyeongju (Kor. 이명주, Chin. 耳明酒), myeongiju (Kor. 명이주, Chin. 明耳酒), yurongju (Kor. 유롱주, Chin. 牖聾酒), chirongju (Kor. 치롱주, Chin. 治聾酒) and ic

Korean Seasonal Customs

Dog Day Porridge

Bokjuk (Kor. 복죽, Chin. 伏粥, lit. Dog Day porridge) refers to a red bean porridge cooked and consumed on Sambok (Kor. 삼복, Chin. 三伏, Three Dog Days, three hottest days in the sixth and seventh lunar months). The custom of eating red bean porridge on the three Dog Days is documented in the “Dongguk Sesigi” (Kor. 동국세시기, Chin. 東國歲時記, A Record of Seasonal Customs in Korea, 1849). Although in modern Korea, red bean porridge is usually associated with the winter solstice, traditionally it was one of the

Korean Seasonal Customs
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