Authors

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HeoYongho

17 count

HeoYongho

17

Sinjangsu

Shoe seller who appears in masked dance-dramas. Sinjangsu is the shoe seller who appears in masked dance-dramas. The shoe seller is a character who appears in Bongsan Talchum, Yangju Byeolsandaenori, Songpa Sandaenori and Toegyewon Sandaenori. The same character is commonly found in masked dance-dramas (gamyeongeuk) that have been passed down in the central part of the country. In addition, Sinjangsu also appears in Bongsan Talchum performed in the Haeseo region. When the shoe seller appears in

Korean Folk Arts

Chwibari

A character who clashes with the old monk Nojang over a woman. A character who appears in the Nojang (old monk) act to drive the old monk out, which is a part of masked dance-dramas performed in the central and Haeseo regions of the country. It has been assumed that the name Chwibari (Kor. 취발이, Chin. 醉僧, lit. drunken monk) refers to a drunken monk. Chwibari, a character who appears in various types of masked dance-dramas (gamyeongeuk), has some common features thrughout all performances. This ch

Korean Folk Arts

Shamanic Mask

Mugeukgamyeon is a term that refers to the masks used in a shamanic ritual. The village tutelary spirit ritual byeolsingut of the east coast regions and the goblin healing ritual yeonggamnori of Jeju Island accompany performances that make use of many different masks, while the cattle ritual sonorigut features a cow mask. Masks are also worn in illness rituals (byeonggut). Byeolsingut of the east coast regions feature a grandmother mask called halmigamyeon, worn by the male shaman (hwaraengi) in

Korean Folk Beliefs

Shamanic Mask

Mugeukgamyeon is a term that refers to the masks used in a shamanic ritual. The village tutelary spirit ritual byeolsingut of the east coast regions and the goblin healing ritual yeonggamnori of Jeju Island accompany performances that make use of many different masks, while the cattle ritual sonorigut features a cow mask. Masks are also worn in illness rituals (byeonggut). Byeolsingut of the east coast regions feature a grandmother mask called halmigamyeon, worn by the male shaman (hwaraengi) in

Korean Folk Beliefs

Shamanic Mask

Mugeukgamyeon is a term that refers to the masks used in a shamanic ritual. The village tutelary spirit ritual byeolsingut of the east coast regions and the goblin healing ritual yeonggamnori of Jeju Island accompany performances that make use of many different masks, while the cattle ritual sonorigut features a cow mask. Masks are also worn in illness rituals (byeonggut). Byeolsingut of the east coast regions feature a grandmother mask called halmigamyeon, worn by the male shaman (hwaraengi) in

Korean Folk Beliefs

Eomuldoga Juin

Fishmonger who appears in baltal, foot puppet play. Fishmonger who appears in baltal puppet plays. A very strict person, Eomuldoga Juin constantly squabbles with Yuramgaek, the wanderer known for his deviant behavior. Along with Yuramgaek, Eomuldoga Juin (Kor. 어물도가 주인, Chin. 魚物都家 主人, lit. owner of a fish shop) leads the baltal performance. The fishmonger has a store in Mapo by the riverside. In front of the shop, he meets Yuramgaek, who is traveling around the country and with whom he is involve

Korean Folk Arts

Yuramgaek

Wanderer character who appears in baltal, foot puppet play. A puppet character who is in constant confrontation with the fishmonger in baltal, a traditional puppet play using the feet. Along with Eomuldoga Juin, Yuramgaek (Kor. 유람객, Chin. 遊覽客, lit. traveling and sightseeing guest) is a key character who leads the baltal performance. This character is also called Tal (mask), because a mask is worn on the character’s face. Otherwise, since the Yuramgaek’s face is the masked foot of the puppeteer,

Korean Folk Arts

Shamanic Mask

Mugeukgamyeon is a term that refers to the masks used in a shamanic ritual. The village tutelary spirit ritual byeolsingut of the east coast regions and the goblin healing ritual yeonggamnori of Jeju Island accompany performances that make use of many different masks, while the cattle ritual sonorigut features a cow mask. Masks are also worn in illness rituals (byeonggut). Byeolsingut of the east coast regions feature a grandmother mask called halmigamyeon, worn by the male shaman (hwaraengi) in

Korean Folk Beliefs

Baltalkkun

Actor and puppeteer in baltal, foot puppet play. Actor who manipulates puppets with the hands and feet and speaks their lines in baltal performances. In baltal, or foot mask play, there is an actor who functions as Yuramgaek, the wanderer. The actor is not a human, however, but a puppet. The human performer who manipulates the puppets and speaks their lines is called Baltalkkun, who sits inside the covered walls of the stage. The behavior and remarks of Yuramgaek, which are seen and heard by the

Korean Folk Arts

Nojang

Old Buddhist monk who becomes an apostate. As one of the characters that appears in Korea’s masked dance-dramas, Nojang (Kor. 노장, lit. old monk) is the general term for all Buddhist monks who have followed the teachings of Buddhism for a long time but ended up becoming apostates. In Buddhism, old and virtuous monks who have long followed the teachings of Buddha are referred to as Nojang. However, the Nojang who appears in Korea’s masked dance-dramas is generally a character who breaks his Buddhi

Korean Folk Arts

Association of Entertainers

Jaeincheong, or Association of Entertainers, was a selfgoverning organization formed by shamans, musicians, acrobats, dancers and clowns. The association was also called Gwangdaecheong (Association of Clowns) or Hwarangcheong (Association of Shamanic Musicians), and maintained offices in Gyeonggi, Chungcheong and Jeolla provinces. It had a strict organizational structure and its members included hereditary shamans (seseummu), shamanic music accompanists (hwarang), acrobats (jaein), singing and d

Korean Folk Beliefs

Clown God

Changbussi, or Clown God, is a deity in charge of entertainment and the arts. Alternate versions of the name include Changbu and Changbudaesin. It is believed that a famous clown died and was enshrined, or deified. Good fortune rituals (jaesugut) held in the Seoul and Gyeonggi regions include a segment dedicated to Changbussi, a character of artistic and theatrical spirit that requires a loud and entertaining performance by musicians and dancers. The deity is also responsible for protecting the

Korean Folk Beliefs

Pak Cheomji Puppet Play of Seosan

Seosan Pak Cheomji Nori (Kor. 서산박첨지놀이, Chin. 瑞山朴僉知-) is a puppet play maintained in Tapgok village (Tapgok 4(sa)-ri, Eumam-myeon, Seosan, South Chungcheong Province). This puppet play is performed around Chuseok (Kor. 추석, Chin. 秋夕, Harvest Festival, the fifteenth of the eighth lunar month) by a troupe of entertainers made up of the members of the local community. Seosan Pak Cheomji Nori is the only surviving puppet play that is performed by local people and not professional entertainers. It was

Korean Seasonal Customs

Goblin

Dokkaebi is a spirit possessing extraordinary powers and skills, using them to enchant, tease, taunt, and sometimes offer help to humans. It is believed that these spirits are formed from old discarded household tools like brooms, pokers, winnow baskets (ki), pestles and sieves, and objects stained with human blood, especially menstrual blood. Dokkaebi usually makes its appearance in dark, humid, eerie corners, mostly at nighttime but also during the day when the weather is foggy with rain. Thes

Korean Folk Beliefs

Inhyeonggeuk

Puppet theater; performing art using puppets. Puppet theater, an independent performing art where dramatic scenes are created using puppets as the main medium of expression. Puppet theater is a form of drama using puppets in disguise (Kor. 가장, Chin. 假裝, lit. false costume) as various characters. This means the puppet characters appear on stage and take charge of the performance. There are not many examples of puppet theater as an independent performing art where the puppet characters appear on s

Korean Folk Arts

Baltal

Puppet play using the feet. Traditional Korean performing art where human actors exchange jokes with puppets that are handled by puppeteers with their hands and feet. Baltal, which literally means “foot mask, ” is also known as baljangnan, joktal, jokgamyeon, jokmuyong and baltalchum. These names originated from the style of performance in which masks cover the feet for manipulation. Baltal can be referred to as masked dance-drama in that masks are used. The name Baltal also emphasizes tal, whic

Korean Folk Arts

Seosan Parkcheomji nori

Puppet play from Seosan, Chungcheongnam-do Province. A puppet play handed down by the villagers of Tapgok-ri Eumam-myeon, Seosan in Chungcheongnam-do Province. Seosan Parkcheomji nori is a puppet play handed down in Tapgok 4-ri, Eummam-myeon, Seosan, Chungcheongnam-do Province. According to the recording by Heo Yeongho, the details of Seosan Parkcheomji nori are as follows. The puppet play can be divided into 20 scenes, taking the oral interjection “tteru tterua tteruya” as the signifier of chan

Korean Folk Arts
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