Taraebeoseon

Taraebeoseon

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Children’s socks with embroidery on either side and colorful tassels attached to the toes.

Taraebeoseon are socks for children, who wore them before their first birthday until the age of two or three. In general, beoseon, traditional socks, were mostly made of plain white cotton, but children’s socks were colorfully decorated to make them look more attractive.

Depending on season, taraebeoson were lined instead of padded and quilted; and sometimes only tassels were attached without any decorative embroidery. Straps were attached to the heels of the socks, which were tied at the ankle to prevent the socks from easily coming off.

The color of the ankle straps served to distinguish boys’ socks from girls.’ Dark blue straps were attached to the back of the ankle in the boys’ socks and red straps to the girls’ socks. Designs expressing wishes for the health and happiness of the children were embroidered with threads of five colors. As the socks had to be washed often they were mostly made of cotton. When children’s socks wore out, they were patched with red cloth signifying good luck. Today, taraebeoseon are often included in a set of ceremonial clothes worn on the baby’s first birthday.

Taraebeoseon

Taraebeoseon
Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer

Children’s socks with embroidery on either side and colorful tassels attached to the toes.

Taraebeoseon are socks for children, who wore them before their first birthday until the age of two or three. In general, beoseon, traditional socks, were mostly made of plain white cotton, but children’s socks were colorfully decorated to make them look more attractive.

Depending on season, taraebeoson were lined instead of padded and quilted; and sometimes only tassels were attached without any decorative embroidery. Straps were attached to the heels of the socks, which were tied at the ankle to prevent the socks from easily coming off.

The color of the ankle straps served to distinguish boys’ socks from girls.’ Dark blue straps were attached to the back of the ankle in the boys’ socks and red straps to the girls’ socks. Designs expressing wishes for the health and happiness of the children were embroidered with threads of five colors. As the socks had to be washed often they were mostly made of cotton. When children’s socks wore out, they were patched with red cloth signifying good luck. Today, taraebeoseon are often included in a set of ceremonial clothes worn on the baby’s first birthday.