Choeui(衰衣)

Choeui

Headword

최의 ( 衰衣 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Upper garment worn by the chief mourner at Confucian-style funeral rites held in traditional Korean society.

Choeui refers to the upper garment of mourning clothes. They are made based on the guides provided by the Family Rites of Zhu Xi. On the front chest of the top a piece of cloth called choe is attached. Here the word choe (衰) means, “to snap, ” “to break, ” “to suppress, ” and thus represents the suppression of grief. For this reason, coarse hemp cloth carrying such meaning is used to make the choeui.

The choeui is marked by differences according to the five types of mourning clothes. Unbleached tough hemp cloth is used to make chamchoe (斬衰), the dull color of such garments being similar to the complexion of the grieving mourner. Jachoe were made of the second toughest hemp cloth sima. Daegong were made of slightly coarse unbleached hemp cloth to express the feelings of sadness and solemnity. Sogong were made with slightly smooth bleached hemp cloth to express the mourner’s dispirited feelings. Since sima (緦麻) was designed to express the grieving appearance of the mourners, it was made with extremely fine unbleached hemp cloth. As for the choeui below the level of daegong, worn at funerals for those of a lesser degree of kinship, jeok, bupan, and byeongnyeong were not attached. The seams of the chamchoeui had to be sewn to be exposed, whereas the seams of choeui worn at funerals for those less than the kinship level of jachoe were folded to keep them out of sight.

Choeui

Choeui
Headword

최의 ( 衰衣 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Upper garment worn by the chief mourner at Confucian-style funeral rites held in traditional Korean society.

Choeui refers to the upper garment of mourning clothes. They are made based on the guides provided by the Family Rites of Zhu Xi. On the front chest of the top a piece of cloth called choe is attached. Here the word choe (衰) means, “to snap, ” “to break, ” “to suppress, ” and thus represents the suppression of grief. For this reason, coarse hemp cloth carrying such meaning is used to make the choeui.

The choeui is marked by differences according to the five types of mourning clothes. Unbleached tough hemp cloth is used to make chamchoe (斬衰), the dull color of such garments being similar to the complexion of the grieving mourner. Jachoe were made of the second toughest hemp cloth sima. Daegong were made of slightly coarse unbleached hemp cloth to express the feelings of sadness and solemnity. Sogong were made with slightly smooth bleached hemp cloth to express the mourner’s dispirited feelings. Since sima (緦麻) was designed to express the grieving appearance of the mourners, it was made with extremely fine unbleached hemp cloth. As for the choeui below the level of daegong, worn at funerals for those of a lesser degree of kinship, jeok, bupan, and byeongnyeong were not attached. The seams of the chamchoeui had to be sewn to be exposed, whereas the seams of choeui worn at funerals for those less than the kinship level of jachoe were folded to keep them out of sight.