Yugeon(儒巾)

Yugeon

Headword

유건 ( 儒巾 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Head scarf, or hood, worn indoors by Confucian scholars without government positions or saengwon (classics licentiate).

During the Joseon Dynasty, clothes and hats carried such great significance that a system was established stipulating that different clothes and hats be worn according to rank. Keeping propriety meant wearing outer robes or coats (po) over jacket and pants (baji jeogori) for men or jacket and skirt (chima jeogori) for women and geon or gwan on the head. For this reason, the men’s coming-of-age ceremony was called gwallye (Kor. 관례, Chin. 冠禮 lit. hat rite). According to Yeseo (Book of Rites), although there were slight differences, yugeon (Kor. 유건, Chin. 儒巾, lit. Confucian hood) was the hat worn during samgarye in the coming-of-age ceremony, referring to the third of three rites in which a different hat was put on each time. This suggests that the yugeon was one of the official hats constituting a part of ceremonial attire during the Joseon period.

Yugeon that are mentioned in records from Joseon are thought to be the hoods worn by students in class at the national Confucian academy Seonggyungwan. In addition men with the title of jinsa (literary licentiate) and saengwon were obliged to wear the yugeon along with black official robe (dallyeong) when they participated in yuga, a parade through the streets after passing the state civil service exams. When a civil official became a military official he was said to have swapped his yugeon for the tugu (iron hat), an expression that shows the yugeon was the symbol of civil officials or Confucian scholars. In addition, the yugeon was also used as the symbol of Confucian scholars without a government position. It seems to have been worn while conducting rites at home in daily life along with the dopo (coat).

Yugeon

Yugeon
Headword

유건 ( 儒巾 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Head scarf, or hood, worn indoors by Confucian scholars without government positions or saengwon (classics licentiate).

During the Joseon Dynasty, clothes and hats carried such great significance that a system was established stipulating that different clothes and hats be worn according to rank. Keeping propriety meant wearing outer robes or coats (po) over jacket and pants (baji jeogori) for men or jacket and skirt (chima jeogori) for women and geon or gwan on the head. For this reason, the men’s coming-of-age ceremony was called gwallye (Kor. 관례, Chin. 冠禮 lit. hat rite). According to Yeseo (Book of Rites), although there were slight differences, yugeon (Kor. 유건, Chin. 儒巾, lit. Confucian hood) was the hat worn during samgarye in the coming-of-age ceremony, referring to the third of three rites in which a different hat was put on each time. This suggests that the yugeon was one of the official hats constituting a part of ceremonial attire during the Joseon period.

Yugeon that are mentioned in records from Joseon are thought to be the hoods worn by students in class at the national Confucian academy Seonggyungwan. In addition men with the title of jinsa (literary licentiate) and saengwon were obliged to wear the yugeon along with black official robe (dallyeong) when they participated in yuga, a parade through the streets after passing the state civil service exams. When a civil official became a military official he was said to have swapped his yugeon for the tugu (iron hat), an expression that shows the yugeon was the symbol of civil officials or Confucian scholars. In addition, the yugeon was also used as the symbol of Confucian scholars without a government position. It seems to have been worn while conducting rites at home in daily life along with the dopo (coat).