Samo(紗帽)

Samo

Headword

사모 ( 紗帽 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer ChoWoohyun(趙又玄)

Official’s hat worn by civil and military officials.

The samo (Kor. 사모, Chin. 紗帽, lit. silk hat) is an official’s hat derived from bokdu and worn by civil and military officials as part of their uniforms from the late Goryeo Dynasty to the late Joseon Dynasty. The samo was first used as an everyday hat by government officials of the late Goryeo period. During the Joseon Dynasty it was worn with both everyday wear and official uniform and gradually became established as official attire and later ceremonial attire.

Generally, a black samo was worn for daily use and a white one at funerals. An old record states that the king wore osamo, which is a black samo. According to Jibong yuseol (Topical Discourse of Jibong Yi Su-gwang), the samo originated from the dugeon of the Chinese Tang Dynasty. During the Yuan Dynasty the dugeon had two straps hanging down, and in later times bamboo or wire was inserted in them to make them stiff and spread out to the side. The surface was woven with thin bamboo strips and horsehair, which was covered with thin silk cloth named sapo. This is presumably why the hat is called samo.

The samo has a low front and high back and “wings” (gak) attached at the back of the hat. The two-tiered samo had a relatively round top compared to bokdu. The two wings attached in the back and the height of the back section changed over time. During the late Goryeo and early Joseon periods, the samo was low and the tips of the two wings on the left and right sides were round and long and pointed down. However, the two wings gradually became wider as they stuck out horizontally. In other words, in the early stage, the samo had a low back section and the two wings looked like black hair ribbons draping down. In the latter half of the 1600s, the back section became much higher and the two wings became longer and narrower, then in the 1700s the wings grew wider again and rounded at the end. In the 1800s, the back section of the hat became lower and the body of the hat longer, while the two wings became shorter and bent inward as if enfolding the hat. The samo, while undergoing many changes, continued to be used until the late Joseon Dynasty.

Samo

Samo
Headword

사모 ( 紗帽 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer ChoWoohyun(趙又玄)

Official’s hat worn by civil and military officials.

The samo (Kor. 사모, Chin. 紗帽, lit. silk hat) is an official’s hat derived from bokdu and worn by civil and military officials as part of their uniforms from the late Goryeo Dynasty to the late Joseon Dynasty. The samo was first used as an everyday hat by government officials of the late Goryeo period. During the Joseon Dynasty it was worn with both everyday wear and official uniform and gradually became established as official attire and later ceremonial attire.

Generally, a black samo was worn for daily use and a white one at funerals. An old record states that the king wore osamo, which is a black samo. According to Jibong yuseol (Topical Discourse of Jibong Yi Su-gwang), the samo originated from the dugeon of the Chinese Tang Dynasty. During the Yuan Dynasty the dugeon had two straps hanging down, and in later times bamboo or wire was inserted in them to make them stiff and spread out to the side. The surface was woven with thin bamboo strips and horsehair, which was covered with thin silk cloth named sapo. This is presumably why the hat is called samo.

The samo has a low front and high back and “wings” (gak) attached at the back of the hat. The two-tiered samo had a relatively round top compared to bokdu. The two wings attached in the back and the height of the back section changed over time. During the late Goryeo and early Joseon periods, the samo was low and the tips of the two wings on the left and right sides were round and long and pointed down. However, the two wings gradually became wider as they stuck out horizontally. In other words, in the early stage, the samo had a low back section and the two wings looked like black hair ribbons draping down. In the latter half of the 1600s, the back section became much higher and the two wings became longer and narrower, then in the 1700s the wings grew wider again and rounded at the end. In the 1800s, the back section of the hat became lower and the body of the hat longer, while the two wings became shorter and bent inward as if enfolding the hat. The samo, while undergoing many changes, continued to be used until the late Joseon Dynasty.