Banji(半紙)

Banji

Headword

반지 ( 半紙 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Ring ornament worn on the finger.

Banji (Kor. 반지, Chin. 半指, lit. half finger) is a generic term for rings, or ornaments worn on the fingers. They are also called jihwan. Humongjahoe (Collection of Characters for Training Children) contains a reference to rings, saying jihwan are called garakji (a pair of rings) or gyeji (戒指, a commitment ring), which indicates the word gyeji was also used interchangeably with banji. By type jihwan can be categorized as banji, which refers to a single ring, and garakji, which refers to a pair of rings. The Korean Dictionary contains the following definition: “An ornamental ring made of gold, silver, beads, or jade worn on the finger. A pair of rings are called garakji while a single ring is called banji. Another name for finger rings is jihwan.” Banji refers to a single ring from a pair of rings. Garakji were given as a token of mutual trust from ancient times. Banji was worn regardless of the wearer’s marital status, whereas garakji were worn only by married women because they symbolized the concepts of iseongjibap (二姓之合, unity of two families as one) and bubuilsin (夫婦一身, husband and wife as one body).

Small, simple but conspicuous ornaments worn on the fingers, rings have served to indicate the wearer’s social status since ancient times. In addition, rings have been worn as a token of love and affection between man and woman and as a symbol of marriage. Although the smallest and simplest ornament, finger rings have been adapted to changing culture and styles through the ages, from ancient times through the Joseon period and to the present day. Rings dating back to the Three Kingdoms period provide a glimpse of cultural exchange among ancient Korean kingdoms and those from the Joseon period show that they were symbolic items to pray for happiness in this world, including longevity and the prosperity of one’s descendants.

Banji

Banji
Headword

반지 ( 半紙 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer

Ring ornament worn on the finger.

Banji (Kor. 반지, Chin. 半指, lit. half finger) is a generic term for rings, or ornaments worn on the fingers. They are also called jihwan. Humongjahoe (Collection of Characters for Training Children) contains a reference to rings, saying jihwan are called garakji (a pair of rings) or gyeji (戒指, a commitment ring), which indicates the word gyeji was also used interchangeably with banji. By type jihwan can be categorized as banji, which refers to a single ring, and garakji, which refers to a pair of rings. The Korean Dictionary contains the following definition: “An ornamental ring made of gold, silver, beads, or jade worn on the finger. A pair of rings are called garakji while a single ring is called banji. Another name for finger rings is jihwan.” Banji refers to a single ring from a pair of rings. Garakji were given as a token of mutual trust from ancient times. Banji was worn regardless of the wearer’s marital status, whereas garakji were worn only by married women because they symbolized the concepts of iseongjibap (二姓之合, unity of two families as one) and bubuilsin (夫婦一身, husband and wife as one body).

Small, simple but conspicuous ornaments worn on the fingers, rings have served to indicate the wearer’s social status since ancient times. In addition, rings have been worn as a token of love and affection between man and woman and as a symbol of marriage. Although the smallest and simplest ornament, finger rings have been adapted to changing culture and styles through the ages, from ancient times through the Joseon period and to the present day. Rings dating back to the Three Kingdoms period provide a glimpse of cultural exchange among ancient Korean kingdoms and those from the Joseon period show that they were symbolic items to pray for happiness in this world, including longevity and the prosperity of one’s descendants.