Dallyeong(團領)

Dallyeong

Headword

단령 ( 團領 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer ChoiEunsoo(崔銀水)

A type of po (robe or coat) with a round collar, dallyeong (Kor. 단령, Chin. 團領 lit. round collar) was worn by all government officials when carrying out official duties.

The word dallyeong specifically refers to a round collar but is also the generic name for coats with round collars.

The dallyeong was adopted as an official uniform during the reign of King U in the late Goryeo Dynasty when an official uniform system was imported from the Ming Dynasty of China. This official uniform was worn accompanied with the official hat (samo), the rank belt (pumdae) made of rhino horn, gold, or silver, and black boots (heukhwa). Dallyeong worn for everyday work were black (actually darkish blue or dark green) in color with the rank badge hyungbae attached, while sibok refers to a red dallyeong worn without rank badge on specific occasions.

Dallyeong artifacts give a glimpse at how the shape of the robe changed over time. In the early Joseon Dynasty it was unlined, so a straight-collar robe called jingnyeong was separately made and worn underneath. In the 17th century, the official uniform became a lined garment made by loosely sewing two single-layer dallyeong together with large stiches. The single layer jingnyeong produced as lining was placed inside the dallyeong and then the collar, overlapping front panel, gores, sleeve hems, and the hems of the inner and outer garments were matched and sewn together with blind stiches or hemming stiches. In the late Joseon Dynasty, the sections of the sleeve inseams, side seams, and back seams in two sets of robes were put together and these three or four layers were sewn together.

The dallyeong is commonly considered a men’s garment because it was used as an official uniform. However, artifacts dating to the early Joseon period show that it was also worn by women. Despite the existence of such historical evidence, opinion is still divided among researchers and it is hard to reach a conclusion on the existence of women’s dallyeong.

Dallyeong

Dallyeong
Headword

단령 ( 團領 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer ChoiEunsoo(崔銀水)

A type of po (robe or coat) with a round collar, dallyeong (Kor. 단령, Chin. 團領 lit. round collar) was worn by all government officials when carrying out official duties.

The word dallyeong specifically refers to a round collar but is also the generic name for coats with round collars.

The dallyeong was adopted as an official uniform during the reign of King U in the late Goryeo Dynasty when an official uniform system was imported from the Ming Dynasty of China. This official uniform was worn accompanied with the official hat (samo), the rank belt (pumdae) made of rhino horn, gold, or silver, and black boots (heukhwa). Dallyeong worn for everyday work were black (actually darkish blue or dark green) in color with the rank badge hyungbae attached, while sibok refers to a red dallyeong worn without rank badge on specific occasions.

Dallyeong artifacts give a glimpse at how the shape of the robe changed over time. In the early Joseon Dynasty it was unlined, so a straight-collar robe called jingnyeong was separately made and worn underneath. In the 17th century, the official uniform became a lined garment made by loosely sewing two single-layer dallyeong together with large stiches. The single layer jingnyeong produced as lining was placed inside the dallyeong and then the collar, overlapping front panel, gores, sleeve hems, and the hems of the inner and outer garments were matched and sewn together with blind stiches or hemming stiches. In the late Joseon Dynasty, the sections of the sleeve inseams, side seams, and back seams in two sets of robes were put together and these three or four layers were sewn together.

The dallyeong is commonly considered a men’s garment because it was used as an official uniform. However, artifacts dating to the early Joseon period show that it was also worn by women. Despite the existence of such historical evidence, opinion is still divided among researchers and it is hard to reach a conclusion on the existence of women’s dallyeong.