Gwallyebok(冠禮服)

Gwallyebok

Headword

관례복 ( 冠禮服 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Attire worn by boys at their coming-of-age ceremony.

As indicated by the term gwallye (Kor. 관례 Chin. 冠禮 lit. hat wearing rite), the hat rite formed the main part of Korea’s traditional coming-of-age ceremony. For the ceremony, boys put their hair up in a topknot and on top of it wore a hat such as a hood (bokgeon), headscarf (dugeon), or gat (traditional formal hat). In traditional Korean society, wearing a hat signified the transition from boy to man. The coming-of-age ceremony was usually held between the ages of 15 and 20. During the ceremony boys changed their hat and clothes three times, thereby signifying the passage to adulthood and assuming responsibility as a member of society.

The meaning of changing clothes is related to the congratulatory message delivered at the three stages of the ceremony. In sigarye, the rite where the first hat is placed on the boy’s head, the congratulatory message was read out as follows: “Now that you are wearing this hat for the first time cast aside your child-like mind, seek mature virtue and live a long life with many blessings.” Changing out of children’s clothes into the Confucian scholar’s robe, simui, meant that the wearer vowed to conduct himself properly as an adult. During the second rite, called jaegarye, the following message was recited: “Now that another hat is being placed on your head you should behave prudently and cultivate virtue, which in turn will bring long life and happiness.” At this stage josam was worn, similar to heukdallyeong (black official’s robe), to show due courtesy for the formality of the occasion. During the last stage, samgarye, the following was recited: “By changing hats three times, human virtue is finally attained. Heaven will reward you with long life and happiness.” During the final ceremony, bokdu (ritual cap) and nansam (Confucian scholar’s robe) were worn, representing ceremonial costume. The reason for changing hats and clothes three times lay in the idea that one must first achieve fundamental virtue as a man to serve the king, and only after serving the king can one properly serve god, which represents three stages toward becoming a true adult.

Gwallyebok

Gwallyebok
Headword

관례복 ( 冠禮服 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Attire worn by boys at their coming-of-age ceremony.

As indicated by the term gwallye (Kor. 관례 Chin. 冠禮 lit. hat wearing rite), the hat rite formed the main part of Korea’s traditional coming-of-age ceremony. For the ceremony, boys put their hair up in a topknot and on top of it wore a hat such as a hood (bokgeon), headscarf (dugeon), or gat (traditional formal hat). In traditional Korean society, wearing a hat signified the transition from boy to man. The coming-of-age ceremony was usually held between the ages of 15 and 20. During the ceremony boys changed their hat and clothes three times, thereby signifying the passage to adulthood and assuming responsibility as a member of society.

The meaning of changing clothes is related to the congratulatory message delivered at the three stages of the ceremony. In sigarye, the rite where the first hat is placed on the boy’s head, the congratulatory message was read out as follows: “Now that you are wearing this hat for the first time cast aside your child-like mind, seek mature virtue and live a long life with many blessings.” Changing out of children’s clothes into the Confucian scholar’s robe, simui, meant that the wearer vowed to conduct himself properly as an adult. During the second rite, called jaegarye, the following message was recited: “Now that another hat is being placed on your head you should behave prudently and cultivate virtue, which in turn will bring long life and happiness.” At this stage josam was worn, similar to heukdallyeong (black official’s robe), to show due courtesy for the formality of the occasion. During the last stage, samgarye, the following was recited: “By changing hats three times, human virtue is finally attained. Heaven will reward you with long life and happiness.” During the final ceremony, bokdu (ritual cap) and nansam (Confucian scholar’s robe) were worn, representing ceremonial costume. The reason for changing hats and clothes three times lay in the idea that one must first achieve fundamental virtue as a man to serve the king, and only after serving the king can one properly serve god, which represents three stages toward becoming a true adult.