Gyeryebok(筓禮服)

Gyeryebok

Headword

계례복 ( 筓禮服 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Attire worn by girls at their coming-of-age ceremony.

Gyerye (Kor. 계례, Chin. 笄禮, lit. binyeo ritual) is the term for a girl’s coming-of-age ceremony, when she puts her hair up and wears an ornamental hair pin called binyeo for the first time. When a girl was to be married she would go through the ritual of undoing her braided ponytail tied with a ribbon, then putting her hair up in a chignon and securing it with a binyeo. Even if they were not about to be married, girls 15-20 years old went through this ceremony in preparation for marriage. Putting a coronet on the head and a binyeo in the chignon represented passage from the world of children to the world of adults and fulfilling one’s role as a member of society while bearing the responsibilities of an adult. In this sense, gyerye is the same as the boy’s coming-of-age ceremony called gwallye. While the gyerye ceremony was rather simple, focused on putting up the hair and securing it with a hair pin, gwallye involved three changes of clothes and hats.

The coming-of-age ceremony for boys and for girls differed not only in form but also in their ceremonial attire and headgear. The girl undertaking the ceremony was called janggyeja (Kor. 장계자, Chin. 將笄者, lit. person waiting to take the gyerye). Dressed in an everyday upper garment reaching to the knees called samja (dangui), the girl would go to the daecheong hall in her home with her hair in a long braid, and an attendant would untie the hair and brush it. After a congratulatory address by the officiant, a coronet (hwagwan or jokduri) was placed on her head and a binyeo was fixed in her chignon. The girl then went inside to put on a sleevless garment called baeja (Kor. 배자, Chin. 背子, lit. back). Made of colored silk, it was the same length as the skirt and had an open front and short sleeves or no sleeves. Gwangnyeram (Kor. 광례람, Chin. 廣禮覽), a book on family rituals, lists the essential elements of the gyerye ceremony: chignon, jokduri, binyeo, realgar for the hair, jeogori (jacket), hongsang (Kor. 홍상, Chin. 紅裳, lit. red skirt) and norigae, which is an ornamental pendant. As this record shows, the bride’s gyerye costume consisted of a red skirt and jacket.

Unlike the male coming-of-age ceremony, gwallye, which involved three changes of clothes into official’s robes according to the rules of samgarye (Kor. 삼가례, Chin. 三加禮, lit. three added rites), the female ceremony involved only one procedure of placing the coronet on the head and the binyeo in the hair and therefore only one outfit. The meaning of gyerye is mentioned in the congratulatory address, which is the same as that of sigarye, the first rite of the male coming-of-age ceremony: “As you are wearing this hat for the first time, put aside the thoughts of childhood to follow adult virtues and live a long life filled with good fortune.”

Gyeryebok

Gyeryebok
Headword

계례복 ( 筓禮服 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Clothing

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Attire worn by girls at their coming-of-age ceremony.

Gyerye (Kor. 계례, Chin. 笄禮, lit. binyeo ritual) is the term for a girl’s coming-of-age ceremony, when she puts her hair up and wears an ornamental hair pin called binyeo for the first time. When a girl was to be married she would go through the ritual of undoing her braided ponytail tied with a ribbon, then putting her hair up in a chignon and securing it with a binyeo. Even if they were not about to be married, girls 15-20 years old went through this ceremony in preparation for marriage. Putting a coronet on the head and a binyeo in the chignon represented passage from the world of children to the world of adults and fulfilling one’s role as a member of society while bearing the responsibilities of an adult. In this sense, gyerye is the same as the boy’s coming-of-age ceremony called gwallye. While the gyerye ceremony was rather simple, focused on putting up the hair and securing it with a hair pin, gwallye involved three changes of clothes and hats.

The coming-of-age ceremony for boys and for girls differed not only in form but also in their ceremonial attire and headgear. The girl undertaking the ceremony was called janggyeja (Kor. 장계자, Chin. 將笄者, lit. person waiting to take the gyerye). Dressed in an everyday upper garment reaching to the knees called samja (dangui), the girl would go to the daecheong hall in her home with her hair in a long braid, and an attendant would untie the hair and brush it. After a congratulatory address by the officiant, a coronet (hwagwan or jokduri) was placed on her head and a binyeo was fixed in her chignon. The girl then went inside to put on a sleevless garment called baeja (Kor. 배자, Chin. 背子, lit. back). Made of colored silk, it was the same length as the skirt and had an open front and short sleeves or no sleeves. Gwangnyeram (Kor. 광례람, Chin. 廣禮覽), a book on family rituals, lists the essential elements of the gyerye ceremony: chignon, jokduri, binyeo, realgar for the hair, jeogori (jacket), hongsang (Kor. 홍상, Chin. 紅裳, lit. red skirt) and norigae, which is an ornamental pendant. As this record shows, the bride’s gyerye costume consisted of a red skirt and jacket.

Unlike the male coming-of-age ceremony, gwallye, which involved three changes of clothes into official’s robes according to the rules of samgarye (Kor. 삼가례, Chin. 三加禮, lit. three added rites), the female ceremony involved only one procedure of placing the coronet on the head and the binyeo in the hair and therefore only one outfit. The meaning of gyerye is mentioned in the congratulatory address, which is the same as that of sigarye, the first rite of the male coming-of-age ceremony: “As you are wearing this hat for the first time, put aside the thoughts of childhood to follow adult virtues and live a long life filled with good fortune.”