Tiger and Dried Persimmon

Tiger and Dried Persimmon

Headword

호랑이와 곶감 ( Tiger and Dried Persimmon )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer KwonHyukrae(權赫來)

This animal tale narrates the story of a foolish tiger that believes that a dried persimmon is a fearful creature and runs away.

This narrative has a long tradition and is transmitted across the country. It has been included in school textbooks since the Japanese colonial period and was adapted as a children’s tale in the 1920s. A similar narrative can be found in the ancient Indian collection Panchatantra from the 4th century.

One night a tiger came down to the village and was hiding in a barn when it heard the mother comforting a crying child. She tried to stop the crying by saying, “A tiger’s coming, you must stop crying, ” but the child kept on crying, and the tiger thought the child must be quite courageous, unafraid of tigers. The mother then mentioned dried persimmons and the child immediately stopped crying. The tiger thought this persimmon must be a creature more fearful than himself. At that moment, a thief who had come to steal the cow leaped on the tiger, thinking it was a cow. The tiger, on his part, thought this creature on his back must be the fearful persimmon and ran with all his might. The thief, realizing that he was riding a tiger, held on with all his might, scared that he would be eaten up if he fell. When morning came, the thief jumped off the tiger and ran to hide behind an old tree, and the tiger ran off as well, sighing with relief. But when the tiger encountered a bear (or hare), the bear said the persimmon was probably only a human and proposed that they go catch him. But when the bear attacked the thief, he pulled at the bear’s testicles, killing it, and the tiger ran away again.

This tale is transmitted in three different types: The first ends with the tiger running away after hearing about the persimmon; the second ends with the tiger running away with the thief on its back; and the third ending with the tiger running away again after trying to catch the thief. In some versions, the tiger falls for the thief’s trick and is killed. And in some versions, the tiger comes after the thief alone, without the bear or the hare.

This tale offers a humorous take on the dynamics between the strong and the weak, the former being defeated due to foolishness and the latter triumphing through wit.

Tiger and Dried Persimmon

Tiger and Dried Persimmon
Headword

호랑이와 곶감 ( Tiger and Dried Persimmon )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer KwonHyukrae(權赫來)

This animal tale narrates the story of a foolish tiger that believes that a dried persimmon is a fearful creature and runs away.

This narrative has a long tradition and is transmitted across the country. It has been included in school textbooks since the Japanese colonial period and was adapted as a children’s tale in the 1920s. A similar narrative can be found in the ancient Indian collection Panchatantra from the 4th century.

One night a tiger came down to the village and was hiding in a barn when it heard the mother comforting a crying child. She tried to stop the crying by saying, “A tiger’s coming, you must stop crying, ” but the child kept on crying, and the tiger thought the child must be quite courageous, unafraid of tigers. The mother then mentioned dried persimmons and the child immediately stopped crying. The tiger thought this persimmon must be a creature more fearful than himself. At that moment, a thief who had come to steal the cow leaped on the tiger, thinking it was a cow. The tiger, on his part, thought this creature on his back must be the fearful persimmon and ran with all his might. The thief, realizing that he was riding a tiger, held on with all his might, scared that he would be eaten up if he fell. When morning came, the thief jumped off the tiger and ran to hide behind an old tree, and the tiger ran off as well, sighing with relief. But when the tiger encountered a bear (or hare), the bear said the persimmon was probably only a human and proposed that they go catch him. But when the bear attacked the thief, he pulled at the bear’s testicles, killing it, and the tiger ran away again.

This tale is transmitted in three different types: The first ends with the tiger running away after hearing about the persimmon; the second ends with the tiger running away with the thief on its back; and the third ending with the tiger running away again after trying to catch the thief. In some versions, the tiger falls for the thief’s trick and is killed. And in some versions, the tiger comes after the thief alone, without the bear or the hare.

This tale offers a humorous take on the dynamics between the strong and the weak, the former being defeated due to foolishness and the latter triumphing through wit.