Big Bluffers(牛皮大王)

Big Bluffers

Headword

허풍선이 ( 牛皮大王 , Big Bluffers )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer NoYounggeun(盧暎根)

This droll tale narrates the story of two men from different regions engaging in a nonsensical contest of words.

A Seoul slicker and a Gyeongsangdo slicker met for a contest of words at Yeongchang River in Miryang. Gyeongsangdo slicker asked where Seoul slicker was headed and he stepped inside the river, answering that he was headed to the banquet at Yonggung (Dragon Palace). After a long while, Seoul slicker emerged from the water, commenting that it was a grand banquet with wonderful delicacies, and handed his opponent chestnuts and jujubes that he claimed were from the banquet. Gyeongsangdo slicker, believing his opponent’s words, stepped inside the river but found nothing underwater, which marked his first defeat. Next Seoul slicker said he had to go buy a laundry stone that had been swept away by the wind, and his opponent said it had landed on a spider web in his yard, which marked his win in the second round.

Variations of this tale usually end in a tie, or Seoul slicker’s triumph after his opponent tries to imitate him. But variations that feature opponents from the plains and from the mountains, the contest always ends in a tie. The determining factor, in the end, is the protagonists’ place of origin, the tale reflecting the social hierarchy formed in different regions across Korea.

Big Bluffers

Big Bluffers
Headword

허풍선이 ( 牛皮大王 , Big Bluffers )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer NoYounggeun(盧暎根)

This droll tale narrates the story of two men from different regions engaging in a nonsensical contest of words.

A Seoul slicker and a Gyeongsangdo slicker met for a contest of words at Yeongchang River in Miryang. Gyeongsangdo slicker asked where Seoul slicker was headed and he stepped inside the river, answering that he was headed to the banquet at Yonggung (Dragon Palace). After a long while, Seoul slicker emerged from the water, commenting that it was a grand banquet with wonderful delicacies, and handed his opponent chestnuts and jujubes that he claimed were from the banquet. Gyeongsangdo slicker, believing his opponent’s words, stepped inside the river but found nothing underwater, which marked his first defeat. Next Seoul slicker said he had to go buy a laundry stone that had been swept away by the wind, and his opponent said it had landed on a spider web in his yard, which marked his win in the second round.

Variations of this tale usually end in a tie, or Seoul slicker’s triumph after his opponent tries to imitate him. But variations that feature opponents from the plains and from the mountains, the contest always ends in a tie. The determining factor, in the end, is the protagonists’ place of origin, the tale reflecting the social hierarchy formed in different regions across Korea.