Kongjwi and Patjwi(黄豆红豆)

Kongjwi and Patjwi

Headword

콩쥐팥쥐 ( 黄豆红豆 , Kongjwi and Patjwi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer KangSungsook(姜盛淑)

This tale narrates the story of Kongjwi (Bean Girl) who dies after suffering from mistreatment by her stepmother and her stepsister Patjwi (Red Bean Girl), but with the help of supernatural beings, overcomes her ordeals and is returned to life.

Kongjwi’s mother passed away and a stepmother moved in, bringing with her a daughter named Patjwi. The stepmother treated Kongjwi abusively and made her carry out difficult chores. One day, the stepmother gave Kongjwi a wooden hoe and Patjwi a metal hoe and ordered them to weed the field. Patjwi was done early and returned home, but Kongjwi broke her hoe and broke into tears. At that moment, a black ox descended from the sky, bringing Kongjwi a metal hoe and weeding the field for her. On another day, as the stepmother left with Patjwi for a banquet at her parents ’home, she told Kongjwi that she could come as well, but only after completing a series of chores: filling the water jar that had a crack; pounding rice; and, spinning and weaving hemp. Kongjwi sat weeping when a toad appeared and filled the hole in the jar, birds flew in to pound the rice, the black ox spun the hemp, and a fairy descended to weave the hemp, bringing Kongjwi a dress and shoes to wear to the banquet. But on the way to the banquet, Kongjwi lost one of her shoes, which the magistrate found and returned to Kongjwi, in the course of which the two married. Patjwi became jealous and lured Kongjwi to the pond, pushing Kongjwi in the water and killing her, after which she posed as Kongjwi. Kongjwi was reincarnated as a flower, and disturbed by the flower, Patjwi threw the flower into the kitchen hearth and burned it. An old woman from the neighborhood came to borrow fire from the hearth, where she found a marble and took it home. The marble transformed into Kongjwi and alerted the magistrate of Patjwi’s identity. The magistrate dug up Kongjwi’s body to revive her and executed Patjwi, sending the corpse to her mother, who died from shock upon seeing her dead daughter.

The many variations of this tale can be categorized into three types: The first type is similar to the classical novel Kongjwipatjwijeon (Tale of Kongjwi and Patjwi); the second features additional motifs of the ox that swallows the hemp to spin it from its anus, of cooking rice in a cauldron with a crack, and Patjwi luring Kongjwi with red bean porridge; the third type leaves out the motif of the lost shoe, possibly omitted in the course of transmission. In these versions, the main characters ’ names also vary widely, from Kongjoji Patjoji, Kongjosi and Patjosi, to Kongrye and Patrye. In some cases, the two characters ’names are reversed.

The version summarized above focuses on the events following Kongjwi’s marriage, which is interpreted by some as a narrative of a woman building her own world through rites of passage. The motifs of death, recincarnation and shapeshifting are related to agrarian mythology, elements that, according to some analysis, are predominant in East Asian narratives, which demonstrate strong demands on the heroines to prove their femininity.

“ Kongjwi and Patjwi ”belongs to the“Cinde-rella ” narrative tradition, combining the marriage tale with the stepmother tale. The latter half of the narrative, of Kongjwi’s death, transformation and reincarnation, is typical of East Asian variations of the Cinderella story. The Korean version was greatly influenced, in the course of the transmission, by the classical novel version of the tale, and also the Western“ Cinderella ” narrative.

Kongjwi and Patjwi

Kongjwi and Patjwi
Headword

콩쥐팥쥐 ( 黄豆红豆 , Kongjwi and Patjwi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer KangSungsook(姜盛淑)

This tale narrates the story of Kongjwi (Bean Girl) who dies after suffering from mistreatment by her stepmother and her stepsister Patjwi (Red Bean Girl), but with the help of supernatural beings, overcomes her ordeals and is returned to life.

Kongjwi’s mother passed away and a stepmother moved in, bringing with her a daughter named Patjwi. The stepmother treated Kongjwi abusively and made her carry out difficult chores. One day, the stepmother gave Kongjwi a wooden hoe and Patjwi a metal hoe and ordered them to weed the field. Patjwi was done early and returned home, but Kongjwi broke her hoe and broke into tears. At that moment, a black ox descended from the sky, bringing Kongjwi a metal hoe and weeding the field for her. On another day, as the stepmother left with Patjwi for a banquet at her parents ’home, she told Kongjwi that she could come as well, but only after completing a series of chores: filling the water jar that had a crack; pounding rice; and, spinning and weaving hemp. Kongjwi sat weeping when a toad appeared and filled the hole in the jar, birds flew in to pound the rice, the black ox spun the hemp, and a fairy descended to weave the hemp, bringing Kongjwi a dress and shoes to wear to the banquet. But on the way to the banquet, Kongjwi lost one of her shoes, which the magistrate found and returned to Kongjwi, in the course of which the two married. Patjwi became jealous and lured Kongjwi to the pond, pushing Kongjwi in the water and killing her, after which she posed as Kongjwi. Kongjwi was reincarnated as a flower, and disturbed by the flower, Patjwi threw the flower into the kitchen hearth and burned it. An old woman from the neighborhood came to borrow fire from the hearth, where she found a marble and took it home. The marble transformed into Kongjwi and alerted the magistrate of Patjwi’s identity. The magistrate dug up Kongjwi’s body to revive her and executed Patjwi, sending the corpse to her mother, who died from shock upon seeing her dead daughter.

The many variations of this tale can be categorized into three types: The first type is similar to the classical novel Kongjwipatjwijeon (Tale of Kongjwi and Patjwi); the second features additional motifs of the ox that swallows the hemp to spin it from its anus, of cooking rice in a cauldron with a crack, and Patjwi luring Kongjwi with red bean porridge; the third type leaves out the motif of the lost shoe, possibly omitted in the course of transmission. In these versions, the main characters ’ names also vary widely, from Kongjoji Patjoji, Kongjosi and Patjosi, to Kongrye and Patrye. In some cases, the two characters ’names are reversed.

The version summarized above focuses on the events following Kongjwi’s marriage, which is interpreted by some as a narrative of a woman building her own world through rites of passage. The motifs of death, recincarnation and shapeshifting are related to agrarian mythology, elements that, according to some analysis, are predominant in East Asian narratives, which demonstrate strong demands on the heroines to prove their femininity.

“ Kongjwi and Patjwi ”belongs to the“Cinde-rella ” narrative tradition, combining the marriage tale with the stepmother tale. The latter half of the narrative, of Kongjwi’s death, transformation and reincarnation, is typical of East Asian variations of the Cinderella story. The Korean version was greatly influenced, in the course of the transmission, by the classical novel version of the tale, and also the Western“ Cinderella ” narrative.