Tiger Helps Son Mourn for His Father’s Death

Tiger Helps Son Mourn for His Father’s Death

Headword

시묘살이 도와준 호랑이 ( Tiger Helps Son Mourn for His Father’s Death )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer KimMyunghee(金明姬)

This tale narrates the story of a tiger that helps a dutiful son serve his three-year mourrning ritual for his father, then is rescued by the son when faced with life-threatening crisis.

A man of the Choe family went to live in a hut by his father’s grave to serve his three-year mourning ritual (simyosari), during which a tiger guarded him and kept him safe. One day Choe heard that a tiger had been captured in the village of Waangsangol and when he went to check, it was the same tiger that had guarded him. He pleaded that he was willing to pay any amount to set the tiger free again, but the villagers were too afraid to open the cage. In the end Choe went inside the cage himself to release the tiger and send it back to the mountain. He could not afford to pay right away, but promised to come up with the money, and when the magistrate heard abou what had happened, he paid the sum on Choe’s behalf and erected a stele honoring the dutiful son.

In Korea’s oral tradition, tigers are viewed as both good and evil. Compared to mythology and legends, folk tales portray tigers in a more negative light, but in moral tales, they are often featured as helpers of loyal subjects, dutiful sons, faithful wives and just men, offering grace and generosity.

Tiger Helps Son Mourn for His Father’s Death

Tiger Helps Son Mourn for His Father’s Death
Headword

시묘살이 도와준 호랑이 ( Tiger Helps Son Mourn for His Father’s Death )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer KimMyunghee(金明姬)

This tale narrates the story of a tiger that helps a dutiful son serve his three-year mourrning ritual for his father, then is rescued by the son when faced with life-threatening crisis.

A man of the Choe family went to live in a hut by his father’s grave to serve his three-year mourning ritual (simyosari), during which a tiger guarded him and kept him safe. One day Choe heard that a tiger had been captured in the village of Waangsangol and when he went to check, it was the same tiger that had guarded him. He pleaded that he was willing to pay any amount to set the tiger free again, but the villagers were too afraid to open the cage. In the end Choe went inside the cage himself to release the tiger and send it back to the mountain. He could not afford to pay right away, but promised to come up with the money, and when the magistrate heard abou what had happened, he paid the sum on Choe’s behalf and erected a stele honoring the dutiful son.

In Korea’s oral tradition, tigers are viewed as both good and evil. Compared to mythology and legends, folk tales portray tigers in a more negative light, but in moral tales, they are often featured as helpers of loyal subjects, dutiful sons, faithful wives and just men, offering grace and generosity.