Lie After Lie

Lie After Lie

Headword

새빨간 거짓말 ( Saebbalgangeojimmal )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer NoYounggeun(盧暎根)

The tale “Saebbalgangeojimmal (Lie After Lie)” reveals the the falsity of the lies depicted in the narrative by listing implausible events and non-existent objects or creatures.

This story tells of Mt. Taishan, on which stands a pear tree without roots, on which hangs a great number of pears without stalks. A headless monk comes and picks all the stalkless pears, collecting them in a skirt without a waistband, and when he lays out the pears on a wooden floor without a log frame, the straw mat floats away on the water, and when he turns over the mat, it is full of lies.

This narrative lists oxymorons like a rootless tree, stalkless fruit, headless monk, making fire with an icicle and selling one wares at an empty market, in the end defining what a lie is. Some variations feature a personified story as the protagonist, some feature different details, as in a watermelon rolling down Mt. Baekdu, and some variations are sung as folk songs (taryeong).

Lie After Lie

Lie After Lie
Headword

새빨간 거짓말 ( Saebbalgangeojimmal )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer NoYounggeun(盧暎根)

The tale “Saebbalgangeojimmal (Lie After Lie)” reveals the the falsity of the lies depicted in the narrative by listing implausible events and non-existent objects or creatures.

This story tells of Mt. Taishan, on which stands a pear tree without roots, on which hangs a great number of pears without stalks. A headless monk comes and picks all the stalkless pears, collecting them in a skirt without a waistband, and when he lays out the pears on a wooden floor without a log frame, the straw mat floats away on the water, and when he turns over the mat, it is full of lies.

This narrative lists oxymorons like a rootless tree, stalkless fruit, headless monk, making fire with an icicle and selling one wares at an empty market, in the end defining what a lie is. Some variations feature a personified story as the protagonist, some feature different details, as in a watermelon rolling down Mt. Baekdu, and some variations are sung as folk songs (taryeong).