Owner of My Own Fortune

Owner of My Own Fortune

Headword

내 복에 산다 ( Owner of My Own Fortune )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer KimDaesook(金大琡)

This tale narrates the story of a daughter who is expelled by her father when she tells him that she is the creator of her own fortune, and meets a poor man but acquires wealth with her ability to find gold, and later reunites with her father and is accepted. Its plot structure is similar to those of the legend of Princess Pyeonggang, documented in the chapter “Ondal” of Samguksagi (Record of the Three Kingdoms), the legend of Princess Seonhwa in the section “Muwang” in Samgungyusa (Memorabilia of Three Kingdoms), and the sha-manic myth “Samgongbonpuri.”

A long time ago, a rich man and his wife had three daughters. One day the father called his three daughters and asked to whom they owed their good fortune. The two older sister answered that they owed their fortune to their father, but the third daughter said, “I am the owner of my own fortune, ” which earned his father’s resentment and led to her expulsion from the family home. The third daughter met and married a poor charcoal maker, when she found a gold mine at a wood charcoal kiln where he worked, for she possessed the ability to seek out gold nuggets. She instructed her husband how to sell the gold, which he followed and they became very rich. The third daughter had a vision that her father lost his wealth after expelling her, and made preparations to meet the family. Her two older sisters had satisfied their father with their answers, but after the father’s fall, they had turned away from their parents’ call for help. The third daughter finally encountered her parents when they came to her door to beg, and the father admitted that she became rich because she was the owner of her own fortune. The third daughter invited them to live with her, offering support and filial piety.

The focus of this narrative is on materials related to gold and metals, including a gold mine, bracelet, and gold piled like mud. In early medieval times, gold was used in weaponry and later came to take on value as currency. The narrative is a mythological account of daughter from a family (community) that dealt with metal weaponry, who after competing with her father for power leaves home, meets a man from a group culturally inferior to her own, develops her talent and abilities, then uses her power to subjugate her father’s group. The charcoal maker, as the mate of the shaman who brings in material wealth, is the one who can control fire, and is seen as a blacksmith.

This tale has been interpreted as a narrative formed by the need to seek compensation for women in the patriarchal society of medieval Korea. Through the confrontation and resolution of conflict between the heroine and her antagonist, the tale weaves a story of a woman with outstanding talent and will, building a life of her own making. The theme also suggests a fatalistic view on human destiny.

Owner of My Own Fortune

Owner of My Own Fortune
Headword

내 복에 산다 ( Owner of My Own Fortune )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer KimDaesook(金大琡)

This tale narrates the story of a daughter who is expelled by her father when she tells him that she is the creator of her own fortune, and meets a poor man but acquires wealth with her ability to find gold, and later reunites with her father and is accepted. Its plot structure is similar to those of the legend of Princess Pyeonggang, documented in the chapter “Ondal” of Samguksagi (Record of the Three Kingdoms), the legend of Princess Seonhwa in the section “Muwang” in Samgungyusa (Memorabilia of Three Kingdoms), and the sha-manic myth “Samgongbonpuri.”

A long time ago, a rich man and his wife had three daughters. One day the father called his three daughters and asked to whom they owed their good fortune. The two older sister answered that they owed their fortune to their father, but the third daughter said, “I am the owner of my own fortune, ” which earned his father’s resentment and led to her expulsion from the family home. The third daughter met and married a poor charcoal maker, when she found a gold mine at a wood charcoal kiln where he worked, for she possessed the ability to seek out gold nuggets. She instructed her husband how to sell the gold, which he followed and they became very rich. The third daughter had a vision that her father lost his wealth after expelling her, and made preparations to meet the family. Her two older sisters had satisfied their father with their answers, but after the father’s fall, they had turned away from their parents’ call for help. The third daughter finally encountered her parents when they came to her door to beg, and the father admitted that she became rich because she was the owner of her own fortune. The third daughter invited them to live with her, offering support and filial piety.

The focus of this narrative is on materials related to gold and metals, including a gold mine, bracelet, and gold piled like mud. In early medieval times, gold was used in weaponry and later came to take on value as currency. The narrative is a mythological account of daughter from a family (community) that dealt with metal weaponry, who after competing with her father for power leaves home, meets a man from a group culturally inferior to her own, develops her talent and abilities, then uses her power to subjugate her father’s group. The charcoal maker, as the mate of the shaman who brings in material wealth, is the one who can control fire, and is seen as a blacksmith.

This tale has been interpreted as a narrative formed by the need to seek compensation for women in the patriarchal society of medieval Korea. Through the confrontation and resolution of conflict between the heroine and her antagonist, the tale weaves a story of a woman with outstanding talent and will, building a life of her own making. The theme also suggests a fatalistic view on human destiny.