Crooked-Back Granny

Crooked-Back Granny

Headword

꼬부랑 할머니 ( Kkoburanghalmeoni )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer NoYounggeun(盧暎根)

“Kkoburanghalmeoni” is a word-play narrative that uses the word “kkoburang, ” meaning, “crooked and curved, ” in repetition to create rhythm and comic effect.

Crooked-Back Granny walks with a crooked walking stick to climb a crooked hill. She sits under a crooked pine and makes crooked feces which a crooked-back dog gobbles up. Crooked-Back Granny strikes the crooked-back dog with her crooked walking stick and the crooked-back dog runs away with a crooked limp, yelping. In some variations, the dog protests after getting struck with the stick.

The formal structure of this narrative falls somewhere between folk song and folk tale. It does have a plot, but is minimal and is not the major element of its transmission. The repetition of the adjective “kkoburang (crooked)” is the essence of the narrative, and it depends on the storyteller to use the word and its lyricism to maximize the impact.

The narrative is better known as a folk song, which was later rearranged as a contemporary children’s song. Another similar example is the tale “Saebbalgangeojinmal (Lie After Lie), ” which is also transmitted as the folk song, “Geojinmaltaryeong (Song of Lies).”

Crooked-Back Granny

Crooked-Back Granny
Headword

꼬부랑 할머니 ( Kkoburanghalmeoni )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Folk tales

Writer NoYounggeun(盧暎根)

“Kkoburanghalmeoni” is a word-play narrative that uses the word “kkoburang, ” meaning, “crooked and curved, ” in repetition to create rhythm and comic effect.

Crooked-Back Granny walks with a crooked walking stick to climb a crooked hill. She sits under a crooked pine and makes crooked feces which a crooked-back dog gobbles up. Crooked-Back Granny strikes the crooked-back dog with her crooked walking stick and the crooked-back dog runs away with a crooked limp, yelping. In some variations, the dog protests after getting struck with the stick.

The formal structure of this narrative falls somewhere between folk song and folk tale. It does have a plot, but is minimal and is not the major element of its transmission. The repetition of the adjective “kkoburang (crooked)” is the essence of the narrative, and it depends on the storyteller to use the word and its lyricism to maximize the impact.

The narrative is better known as a folk song, which was later rearranged as a contemporary children’s song. Another similar example is the tale “Saebbalgangeojinmal (Lie After Lie), ” which is also transmitted as the folk song, “Geojinmaltaryeong (Song of Lies).”