Boyang(宝壤)

Boyang

Headword

보양 ( 宝壤 , Boyang )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Legends

Writer ParkSungji(朴聖智)

The legend of Boyang narrates of the story of a monk from the temple Unmunseonsa during late Silla and early Goryeo, who ordered the serpent Imugi to bring rain and protected the dragon from the wrath of the celestial emperor Cheonje.

When the monk Boyang was returning from China, Seohaeyongwang (Dragon King of West Sea) bestowed upon him a golden silk robe and ordered his son Imok (Imugi) to escort Boyang. Upon arrival, Boyang, in accordance with the Dragon King’s orders, built a temple named Jakgapsa in the spot that magpies were pecking. At nightfall, upon Boyang’s orders Imok made it rain, which the celestial emperor Cheonje deemed was out of Imok’s bounds, and tried to kill him. Boyang made Imok hide under the table and when the celestial messenger demanded for the serpent, Boyang pointed at a pear tree, which in Chinese characters is a homonym for Imok. The celestial messenger struck the pear tree with lightning before ascending to the heavens, and Imok caressed the pear tree back to life.

Variations of the Boyang and Imok legend are transmitted orally around Miryang and the temples Unmunsa and Daebisa, in Cheongdo, Gyeongsang Province. The various versions sometimes include other motifs but most revolve around the narrative element of“ the serpent imugi that fails to become a dragon. ”The most widely known version is the one from Cheongdo, about the serpent imugi that is believed to live in the pond Sirae Hobakso. A monk found it suspicious when a senior monk disappeared each night, and followed him to the reservoir Daebiji, where he jolted and shook, in a struggle to turn into a dragon. As the monster serpent soared to the sky, his true identity revealed, he hit Eoksan Rock, located to the south of the temple, with his tail, leaving a pointed tip.

The pond where the monster serpent imugi is believed to live is called Hobakso, which means Mortar Pond. According to the book Dongguk­yeojiseungnam (Augmented Survey of the Geography of the Eastern Kingdom), putting a tiger head inside the pond brought rain, which signifies that the pond served as the venue for rain rites (giuje). The version of the legend transmitted today also accounts that after his identity was revealed, the serpent has since lived in Hobakso. Related legends that followed grew more distant from the influence of Buddhism and the serpent’s limitations, despite his ability to bring rain, was increasingly emphasized.

Boyang

Boyang
Headword

보양 ( 宝壤 , Boyang )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Legends

Writer ParkSungji(朴聖智)

The legend of Boyang narrates of the story of a monk from the temple Unmunseonsa during late Silla and early Goryeo, who ordered the serpent Imugi to bring rain and protected the dragon from the wrath of the celestial emperor Cheonje.

When the monk Boyang was returning from China, Seohaeyongwang (Dragon King of West Sea) bestowed upon him a golden silk robe and ordered his son Imok (Imugi) to escort Boyang. Upon arrival, Boyang, in accordance with the Dragon King’s orders, built a temple named Jakgapsa in the spot that magpies were pecking. At nightfall, upon Boyang’s orders Imok made it rain, which the celestial emperor Cheonje deemed was out of Imok’s bounds, and tried to kill him. Boyang made Imok hide under the table and when the celestial messenger demanded for the serpent, Boyang pointed at a pear tree, which in Chinese characters is a homonym for Imok. The celestial messenger struck the pear tree with lightning before ascending to the heavens, and Imok caressed the pear tree back to life.

Variations of the Boyang and Imok legend are transmitted orally around Miryang and the temples Unmunsa and Daebisa, in Cheongdo, Gyeongsang Province. The various versions sometimes include other motifs but most revolve around the narrative element of“ the serpent imugi that fails to become a dragon. ”The most widely known version is the one from Cheongdo, about the serpent imugi that is believed to live in the pond Sirae Hobakso. A monk found it suspicious when a senior monk disappeared each night, and followed him to the reservoir Daebiji, where he jolted and shook, in a struggle to turn into a dragon. As the monster serpent soared to the sky, his true identity revealed, he hit Eoksan Rock, located to the south of the temple, with his tail, leaving a pointed tip.

The pond where the monster serpent imugi is believed to live is called Hobakso, which means Mortar Pond. According to the book Dongguk­yeojiseungnam (Augmented Survey of the Geography of the Eastern Kingdom), putting a tiger head inside the pond brought rain, which signifies that the pond served as the venue for rain rites (giuje). The version of the legend transmitted today also accounts that after his identity was revealed, the serpent has since lived in Hobakso. Related legends that followed grew more distant from the influence of Buddhism and the serpent’s limitations, despite his ability to bring rain, was increasingly emphasized.