Rock of Fallen Flowers(落花岩)

Rock of Fallen Flowers

Headword

낙화암 ( 落花岩 , Nakhwaam )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Legends

Writer ParkJongik(朴鍾翼)

This legend of Nakhwaam (Rock of Fallen Flowers) tells the story of concubines and court ladies during the reign of Baekje’s King Uija, who jumped off the rock when Silla-Tang allied forces conquered the Baekje capital.

When Baekje’s capital Buyeo had fallen to Silla and Tang China’s allied forces, King Uija and his concubines and court ladies fled the fortress, reaching the rock Nakhwaam. The women threw themselves off the rock, saying, “We would rather take our own lives than die in the hands of others.”Thus the rock came to be called Nakhwaam, or Rock of Fallen Flowers.

The legend of Nakhwaam, although based on a historical event, is transmitted in a wide range of variations, including tales like “Three Thousand Court Ladies Throw Themselves into Baengma River, ” many of which include motifs about King Uija’s political mistakes, including the expulsion of loyal subjects, which lead to the fall of Baekje and the sacrifice of the women. It is notable that this variation features three thousand court ladies, a detail not mentioned in Samgungnyusa (Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms), in which the legend of Nakhwaam is recorded, which is assumed to be an exaggeration based on King Uija’s debauchery toward the end of his reign.

Rock of Fallen Flowers

Rock of Fallen Flowers
Headword

낙화암 ( 落花岩 , Nakhwaam )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Legends

Writer ParkJongik(朴鍾翼)

This legend of Nakhwaam (Rock of Fallen Flowers) tells the story of concubines and court ladies during the reign of Baekje’s King Uija, who jumped off the rock when Silla-Tang allied forces conquered the Baekje capital.

When Baekje’s capital Buyeo had fallen to Silla and Tang China’s allied forces, King Uija and his concubines and court ladies fled the fortress, reaching the rock Nakhwaam. The women threw themselves off the rock, saying, “We would rather take our own lives than die in the hands of others.”Thus the rock came to be called Nakhwaam, or Rock of Fallen Flowers.

The legend of Nakhwaam, although based on a historical event, is transmitted in a wide range of variations, including tales like “Three Thousand Court Ladies Throw Themselves into Baengma River, ” many of which include motifs about King Uija’s political mistakes, including the expulsion of loyal subjects, which lead to the fall of Baekje and the sacrifice of the women. It is notable that this variation features three thousand court ladies, a detail not mentioned in Samgungnyusa (Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms), in which the legend of Nakhwaam is recorded, which is assumed to be an exaggeration based on King Uija’s debauchery toward the end of his reign.