Origin of Gate God(门前本解)

Origin of Gate God

Headword

문전본풀이 ( 门前本解 , Munjeonbonpuri )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Mythology

Writer ParkKyungsin(朴敬伸)

“Munjeonbonpuri”is a shamanic myth from Jeju Island that tells the story of the origins of Munsin, or Gate God. The epic is recited as part of village rituals on Jeju and the title also refers to the ritual segment.

Scholar Nam from Namseon Village and Lady Yeosan from Yeosan Village lived in poverty with their seven sons. One day Lady Yeosan proposes that her husband take up work in grain trade, and Nam leaves on a boat. Upon reaching Odong (Paulownia) Village of Odong Kingdom, Nam is lured into a scheme by the daughter of the wicked Noiljedaegwiil, squandering all his money. He ends up living off this woman, barely surviving on bran porridge and eventually losing his sight after years of malnutrition.

After waiting so long for her husband’s return, Lady Yeosan sets out on a boat that her sons built to find Nam and reaches Odong Kingdom, where she hears, while wandering all around the country, children singing a song about Nam’s whereabouts. At Nam’s house, Lady Yeosan begs for a room to lodge overnight, but Nam, being blind, does not recognize her and refuses. Lady Yeosan persists and is finally offered a mud hut, where she cooks rice that she has brought with her and serves it to her long-lost husband. After taking a spoon of the rice, Nam breaks into tears and tells his story, that back in Namseon Village he had been Scholar Nam who lived with Lady Yeosan and ate white rice, but had set out to work in the grain trade and lost his money in the hands of the scheming daughter of Noiljedaegwiil. At this, Lady Yeosan reveals her identity and the husband and wife are reunited.

The daughter of Noiljedaegwiil returns home to learn of this, and invites Lady Yeosan to take a bath with her at a pond at Jucheon River, where she offers to give Lady Yeosan a back scrub then kills her by pushing her into the water. Then she poses as Lady Yeosan, telling Nam, “The daughter of Noiljedaegwiil was a wicked woman and I had to push her into the pond at Jucheon River and kill her.”Nam believes this and proposes that they now return home.

Upon the couple’s arrival at Namseon Village, the seven brothers see that this woman is not their mother. The daughter of Noiljedaegwiil notices this and schemes to murder the seven brothers. Claiming that she is suffering from terrible stomach pain, she sends Nam to a fortuneteller out on the main street who performs divination while wearing a straw bag over her head. After Nam sets out, Noiljedaegwiil’s daughter takes a shortcut to the main street and sits down with a straw bag over her head to pose as the fortuneteller, telling Nam that the only cure for his wife is to eat the livers of all seven brothers. The foolish Nam falls for this scheme and comes home to sharpen his knife to kill his sons. But their next-door neighbor, the Witch of Mt. Cheongtae, comes over to borrow fire and learns why Nam is sharpening his knife, then alerts the seven brothers. The youngest son tricks Nam by offering to bring back the livers of his six brothers, that his father will then only have to kill him upon his return, then takes his brothers up to the mountain.

Exhausted, the seven brothers are dozing in the mountain when their mother appears in dream and says, “ A roe deer will come by and if you surround it and try to kill it, you will be given an instruction. ” And indeed a deer comes by and when the brothers lay siege to it in an attempt to kill it, the deer tells them seven boars will soon be coming around, and that the brothers should let the mother boar live but take out the livers of her six offspring. The brothers wait and indeed seven boars come around, the brothers retrieving the livers of the six baby boars. Returning home, the youngest son instructs his brothers to run in when he shouts, and goes inside to give the six boar livers to the daughter of Noiljedaegwiil for her to eat. But when he peeks in through the door, Noiljedaegwiil’s daughter only pretends to eat and hides the livers underneath her seat. The youngest son takes Noiljedaegwiil’s daughter by her hair, wrapping her locks around his fist, shouting to call out to his brothers and to alert the villagers of her crime.

Scholar Nam runs away in alarm but gets his neck caught in the wooden crossbeams of the gate ( jeongnang) and in his death becomes Jumokjisin (Pillar God), and the daughter of Noiljedaegwiil hangs herself in the outhouse, becoming Cheukdobuin (Outhouse Goddess). The seven brothers head to Seocheonkkotbat (Flower Garden of the West) and pick Resurrection Flowers to bring their mother back from death and to worship her as Jowangsin (Kitchen God), the seven of them serving as her divine officials.

“ Munjeonbonpuri ”tells the story about the many gods that oversee the various parts of a home and their origins. The myth is usually recited as a part of village rituals on Jeju Island and at shamanic rites held upon the construction of a new house or after an expansion, or as part of hand-rubbing gate rituals (munjeonbinyeom) held on New Year. The story can also be viewed as a folk tale, similar versions of which have been passed down in different regions under different titles, including the shamanic song “ Salpuri ”of North and South Hamgyeong provinces; “ Seongsingut (Seven Stars Ritual) ”of North and South Pyeongan provinces; and“ Chilseonggut (Seven Stars Ritual) ”or“ Chilseongpuri (Myth of Seven Stars) ”of South Chungcheong Province and North and South Jeolla provinces.

Origin of Gate God

Origin of Gate God
Headword

문전본풀이 ( 门前本解 , Munjeonbonpuri )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Folk Literature > Folk tales > Mythology

Writer ParkKyungsin(朴敬伸)

“Munjeonbonpuri”is a shamanic myth from Jeju Island that tells the story of the origins of Munsin, or Gate God. The epic is recited as part of village rituals on Jeju and the title also refers to the ritual segment.

Scholar Nam from Namseon Village and Lady Yeosan from Yeosan Village lived in poverty with their seven sons. One day Lady Yeosan proposes that her husband take up work in grain trade, and Nam leaves on a boat. Upon reaching Odong (Paulownia) Village of Odong Kingdom, Nam is lured into a scheme by the daughter of the wicked Noiljedaegwiil, squandering all his money. He ends up living off this woman, barely surviving on bran porridge and eventually losing his sight after years of malnutrition.

After waiting so long for her husband’s return, Lady Yeosan sets out on a boat that her sons built to find Nam and reaches Odong Kingdom, where she hears, while wandering all around the country, children singing a song about Nam’s whereabouts. At Nam’s house, Lady Yeosan begs for a room to lodge overnight, but Nam, being blind, does not recognize her and refuses. Lady Yeosan persists and is finally offered a mud hut, where she cooks rice that she has brought with her and serves it to her long-lost husband. After taking a spoon of the rice, Nam breaks into tears and tells his story, that back in Namseon Village he had been Scholar Nam who lived with Lady Yeosan and ate white rice, but had set out to work in the grain trade and lost his money in the hands of the scheming daughter of Noiljedaegwiil. At this, Lady Yeosan reveals her identity and the husband and wife are reunited.

The daughter of Noiljedaegwiil returns home to learn of this, and invites Lady Yeosan to take a bath with her at a pond at Jucheon River, where she offers to give Lady Yeosan a back scrub then kills her by pushing her into the water. Then she poses as Lady Yeosan, telling Nam, “The daughter of Noiljedaegwiil was a wicked woman and I had to push her into the pond at Jucheon River and kill her.”Nam believes this and proposes that they now return home.

Upon the couple’s arrival at Namseon Village, the seven brothers see that this woman is not their mother. The daughter of Noiljedaegwiil notices this and schemes to murder the seven brothers. Claiming that she is suffering from terrible stomach pain, she sends Nam to a fortuneteller out on the main street who performs divination while wearing a straw bag over her head. After Nam sets out, Noiljedaegwiil’s daughter takes a shortcut to the main street and sits down with a straw bag over her head to pose as the fortuneteller, telling Nam that the only cure for his wife is to eat the livers of all seven brothers. The foolish Nam falls for this scheme and comes home to sharpen his knife to kill his sons. But their next-door neighbor, the Witch of Mt. Cheongtae, comes over to borrow fire and learns why Nam is sharpening his knife, then alerts the seven brothers. The youngest son tricks Nam by offering to bring back the livers of his six brothers, that his father will then only have to kill him upon his return, then takes his brothers up to the mountain.

Exhausted, the seven brothers are dozing in the mountain when their mother appears in dream and says, “ A roe deer will come by and if you surround it and try to kill it, you will be given an instruction. ” And indeed a deer comes by and when the brothers lay siege to it in an attempt to kill it, the deer tells them seven boars will soon be coming around, and that the brothers should let the mother boar live but take out the livers of her six offspring. The brothers wait and indeed seven boars come around, the brothers retrieving the livers of the six baby boars. Returning home, the youngest son instructs his brothers to run in when he shouts, and goes inside to give the six boar livers to the daughter of Noiljedaegwiil for her to eat. But when he peeks in through the door, Noiljedaegwiil’s daughter only pretends to eat and hides the livers underneath her seat. The youngest son takes Noiljedaegwiil’s daughter by her hair, wrapping her locks around his fist, shouting to call out to his brothers and to alert the villagers of her crime.

Scholar Nam runs away in alarm but gets his neck caught in the wooden crossbeams of the gate ( jeongnang) and in his death becomes Jumokjisin (Pillar God), and the daughter of Noiljedaegwiil hangs herself in the outhouse, becoming Cheukdobuin (Outhouse Goddess). The seven brothers head to Seocheonkkotbat (Flower Garden of the West) and pick Resurrection Flowers to bring their mother back from death and to worship her as Jowangsin (Kitchen God), the seven of them serving as her divine officials.

“ Munjeonbonpuri ”tells the story about the many gods that oversee the various parts of a home and their origins. The myth is usually recited as a part of village rituals on Jeju Island and at shamanic rites held upon the construction of a new house or after an expansion, or as part of hand-rubbing gate rituals (munjeonbinyeom) held on New Year. The story can also be viewed as a folk tale, similar versions of which have been passed down in different regions under different titles, including the shamanic song “ Salpuri ”of North and South Hamgyeong provinces; “ Seongsingut (Seven Stars Ritual) ”of North and South Pyeongan provinces; and“ Chilseonggut (Seven Stars Ritual) ”or“ Chilseongpuri (Myth of Seven Stars) ”of South Chungcheong Province and North and South Jeolla provinces.