Flower Petal Pancakes(花煎)

Flower Petal Pancakes

Headword

화전 ( 花煎 , Hwajeon )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Spring > 3rd Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer JooYoungha(周永河)

Hwajeon (Kor. 화전, Chin, 花煎, flower petal pancakes) are made by cooking thin, round shaped pieces of glutinous rice dough over an oiled pan and placing the petals of seasonal flowers on the top of the pancake. This type of pancake is also referred to as kkotjijimii (Kor. 꽃지지미) or kkotbukkumi (Kor. 꽃부꾸미). These cakes were often used as part of decorative piles of cakes on ritual altars for exorcism rites or memorial services. In spring, hwajeon are made with azalea petals (dugyeonhwajeon, Kor. 두견화전, Chin. 杜鵑花煎) or petals of pear blossoms (ihwajeon, Kor. 이화전, Chin. 梨花煎). In summer, it is common to use rose petals (jangmihwajeon, Kor. 장미화전, Chin. 薔薇花煎), and during autumn, yellow chrysanthemum or mother chrysanthemum (gukhwajeon, Kor. 국화전, Chin. 菊花煎). If no flower petals are available, housewives decorate the pancakes with dropwort, mugwort, iwatake (Umbilicaria esculenta) or dates, which are cut into flower shapes.

The usual way of cooking hwajeon pancakes is as follows: First, petals are collected from seasonal blossoms and cleaned by rinsing in fresh water. Glutinous rice is finely crushed and salted. Next, hot water is added and the mixture is stirred into the dough. The cook tears off small, chestnut-size pieces of dough and flattens them with the palm of her hand into round-shaped bite-size pancakes. The cakes are first cooked on a frying pan over medium heat and then decorated by placing several petals into a desired pattern on top. Lastly, the cakes are fried again until they turn a light golden color.

Flower Petal Pancakes

Flower Petal Pancakes
Headword

화전 ( 花煎 , Hwajeon )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Spring > 3rd Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer JooYoungha(周永河)

Hwajeon (Kor. 화전, Chin, 花煎, flower petal pancakes) are made by cooking thin, round shaped pieces of glutinous rice dough over an oiled pan and placing the petals of seasonal flowers on the top of the pancake. This type of pancake is also referred to as kkotjijimii (Kor. 꽃지지미) or kkotbukkumi (Kor. 꽃부꾸미). These cakes were often used as part of decorative piles of cakes on ritual altars for exorcism rites or memorial services. In spring, hwajeon are made with azalea petals (dugyeonhwajeon, Kor. 두견화전, Chin. 杜鵑花煎) or petals of pear blossoms (ihwajeon, Kor. 이화전, Chin. 梨花煎). In summer, it is common to use rose petals (jangmihwajeon, Kor. 장미화전, Chin. 薔薇花煎), and during autumn, yellow chrysanthemum or mother chrysanthemum (gukhwajeon, Kor. 국화전, Chin. 菊花煎). If no flower petals are available, housewives decorate the pancakes with dropwort, mugwort, iwatake (Umbilicaria esculenta) or dates, which are cut into flower shapes.

The usual way of cooking hwajeon pancakes is as follows: First, petals are collected from seasonal blossoms and cleaned by rinsing in fresh water. Glutinous rice is finely crushed and salted. Next, hot water is added and the mixture is stirred into the dough. The cook tears off small, chestnut-size pieces of dough and flattens them with the palm of her hand into round-shaped bite-size pancakes. The cakes are first cooked on a frying pan over medium heat and then decorated by placing several petals into a desired pattern on top. Lastly, the cakes are fried again until they turn a light golden color.