Lit. bride’s greeting to her parents-in-law(見舅姑禮)

Lit. bride’s greeting to her parents-in-law

Headword

현구고례 ( 見舅姑禮 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Hollye

Writer LeeGilpyo(李吉杓)

First ceremonial exchange of greetings between the bride and her parents-in-law after marriage when the bride offers pyebaek (Kor. 폐백, Chin. 幣帛, gifts the bride gives to in-laws with a deep bow).

Hyeongugorye refers to the bride’s visit to the groom’s house for the first time after marriage to pay respects to her in-laws, making a deep bow and offering pyebaek. This is also when sanggyeollye (Kor. 상견례, Chin. 相見禮, lit. first meeting between bride’s family and groom’s family) is held between the bride and extended members of the groom’s family. The tradition of offering pyebaek is still observed today.

The procedure of hyeongugorye is as follows. The bride first makes a deep bow to her father-in-law in the main hall of the groom’s house. Then the sumo (Kor. 수모, Chin. 手母, bride’s attendant) unwraps the cloth holding the jujubes and gives them to the bride who places them on the table in front of her father-in-law. Then the bride bows before her mother-inlaw, and in the same manner, the attendant takes meat from the wrapping cloth and gives it to the bride who places it on the table in front of her mother-in-law. The groom does not join in the bowing, but stands next to his father. Only the bride bows before her in-laws, who in return give words of blessing. But the groom’s parents do not give the bride any gifts such as cash or jewelry on the spot. Even if the groom’s grandparents are present, the bride pays respects to her parents-in-law first and then together with her mother-in-law goes to the grandparents’ room and pays her respects to them. If both paternal and maternal grandparents are alive, then the bride prepares two sets of pyebaek. The bride does not offer pyebaek to other family members.

After hyeongugorye, the mother-in-law performs gyerye (Kor. 계례, Chin. 笄禮, coming-of-age ceremony) where the bride’s hair is braided and put up into a chignon. Then the bride changes into hanbok (traditional dress) consisting of a green jeogori (top) and red skirt that the in-laws had made for her; she wears the jewelry her in-laws gave her as a gift and is presented with a large table laden with food. Three days later, the bride goes to the sadang (Kor. 사당, Chin. 祠堂, shrine) to pay respects to the in-laws’ ancestral spirits and offer pyebaek. If the father-in-law is deceased, the bride offers jujubes, if the mother-in-law is deceased, she offers meat in the form of beef jerky or slices of dried meat. Only family members could enter the shrine, which meant that instead of the bride’s attendant, a female member of the in-laws’ family had to accompany the bride to help her.

Lit. bride’s greeting to her parents-in-law

Lit. bride’s greeting to her parents-in-law
Headword

현구고례 ( 見舅姑禮 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Hollye

Writer LeeGilpyo(李吉杓)

First ceremonial exchange of greetings between the bride and her parents-in-law after marriage when the bride offers pyebaek (Kor. 폐백, Chin. 幣帛, gifts the bride gives to in-laws with a deep bow).

Hyeongugorye refers to the bride’s visit to the groom’s house for the first time after marriage to pay respects to her in-laws, making a deep bow and offering pyebaek. This is also when sanggyeollye (Kor. 상견례, Chin. 相見禮, lit. first meeting between bride’s family and groom’s family) is held between the bride and extended members of the groom’s family. The tradition of offering pyebaek is still observed today.

The procedure of hyeongugorye is as follows. The bride first makes a deep bow to her father-in-law in the main hall of the groom’s house. Then the sumo (Kor. 수모, Chin. 手母, bride’s attendant) unwraps the cloth holding the jujubes and gives them to the bride who places them on the table in front of her father-in-law. Then the bride bows before her mother-inlaw, and in the same manner, the attendant takes meat from the wrapping cloth and gives it to the bride who places it on the table in front of her mother-in-law. The groom does not join in the bowing, but stands next to his father. Only the bride bows before her in-laws, who in return give words of blessing. But the groom’s parents do not give the bride any gifts such as cash or jewelry on the spot. Even if the groom’s grandparents are present, the bride pays respects to her parents-in-law first and then together with her mother-in-law goes to the grandparents’ room and pays her respects to them. If both paternal and maternal grandparents are alive, then the bride prepares two sets of pyebaek. The bride does not offer pyebaek to other family members.

After hyeongugorye, the mother-in-law performs gyerye (Kor. 계례, Chin. 笄禮, coming-of-age ceremony) where the bride’s hair is braided and put up into a chignon. Then the bride changes into hanbok (traditional dress) consisting of a green jeogori (top) and red skirt that the in-laws had made for her; she wears the jewelry her in-laws gave her as a gift and is presented with a large table laden with food. Three days later, the bride goes to the sadang (Kor. 사당, Chin. 祠堂, shrine) to pay respects to the in-laws’ ancestral spirits and offer pyebaek. If the father-in-law is deceased, the bride offers jujubes, if the mother-in-law is deceased, she offers meat in the form of beef jerky or slices of dried meat. Only family members could enter the shrine, which meant that instead of the bride’s attendant, a female member of the in-laws’ family had to accompany the bride to help her.