Offering of liquor to ancestral spirits(獻爵)

Offering of liquor to ancestral spirits

Headword

헌작 ( 獻爵 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Jerye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Part of a memorial rite where liquor is offered to an ancestral spirit to ask for good fortune.

As part of a memorial rite, heonjak signifies communication with the ancestral spirits and asking them to bring good fortune. Liquor was offered because it was thought that the ecstatic state achieved through drinking was a medium for communicating with the spirits. It was believed that by drinking liquor, the living and the spirits could communicate with each other in this state of ecstasy, which is why heonjak was considered an important part of ancestral rites in East Asian tradition. Usually three offerings of liquor are made at memorial rites: choheon (Kor. 초헌, Chin. 初獻, first liquor offering); aheon (Kor. 아헌, Chin. 亞獻, second liquor offering); jongheon (Kor. 종헌, Chin. 終獻, final liquor offering). The offering of libation is performed by heongwan (Kor. 헌관, Chin. 獻官, libation officiant). The choheongwan (Kor. 초헌관, Chin. 初獻官, first libation officiant) must always be the eldest son, the family head, while the aheongwan (Kor. 아헌관, Chin. 亞獻官, second libation officiant) is his spouse, and the jongheongwan (Kor. 종헌관, Chin. 終獻官, final libation officiant) is usually a senior member of the family or a guest. Before each libation, grilled meat, vegetables or fish are prepared and set on the ritual table.

Offering of liquor to ancestral spirits

Offering of liquor to ancestral spirits
Headword

헌작 ( 獻爵 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Jerye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Part of a memorial rite where liquor is offered to an ancestral spirit to ask for good fortune.

As part of a memorial rite, heonjak signifies communication with the ancestral spirits and asking them to bring good fortune. Liquor was offered because it was thought that the ecstatic state achieved through drinking was a medium for communicating with the spirits. It was believed that by drinking liquor, the living and the spirits could communicate with each other in this state of ecstasy, which is why heonjak was considered an important part of ancestral rites in East Asian tradition. Usually three offerings of liquor are made at memorial rites: choheon (Kor. 초헌, Chin. 初獻, first liquor offering); aheon (Kor. 아헌, Chin. 亞獻, second liquor offering); jongheon (Kor. 종헌, Chin. 終獻, final liquor offering). The offering of libation is performed by heongwan (Kor. 헌관, Chin. 獻官, libation officiant). The choheongwan (Kor. 초헌관, Chin. 初獻官, first libation officiant) must always be the eldest son, the family head, while the aheongwan (Kor. 아헌관, Chin. 亞獻官, second libation officiant) is his spouse, and the jongheongwan (Kor. 종헌관, Chin. 終獻官, final libation officiant) is usually a senior member of the family or a guest. Before each libation, grilled meat, vegetables or fish are prepared and set on the ritual table.