Taro Soup(土卵-)

Headword

토란국 ( 土卵- , Toranguk )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 8th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer YoonSookja(尹淑子)

Toranguk (Kor. 토란국, Chin. 土卵-, lit. taro soup) is a soup prepared by simmering taro stems in a beef broth made from brisket. Taro soup is a popular dish for Chuseok (Kor. 추석, Chin. 秋夕, Harvest Festival, the fifteenth of the eight lunar month), and can also be referred to as toran gomguk (Kor. 토란곰국). Based on a record in the literary anthology, “Dongguk Isanggukjip” (Kor. 동국이상국집, Chin. 東國李相國集, Collected Works of Minister Yi of the Eastern Kingdom) of the Goryeo period (918-1392), “taro soup was eaten in the countryside” and was already widespread in Korea already during the Goryeo dynasty.

Taro is a vegetable that is most nutritious and tasty around Chuseok. In Korean it is referred to as toran (Kor. 토란, Chin. 土卵, lit, eggs inside soil) or toryeon (Kor. 토련, Chin. 土蓮, lit. earth lotus), in reference to the shape of its leaves that resemble the broad leaves of the lotus. Taro is generally pre-treated before being added to broth. When added raw, it can give soup a greenish color or a slimy texture. Taro is usually boiled in salt water or water left over from rinsing rice. In oriental medicine, taro is an herbal ingredient that has a cooling effect on the intestines and stimulates the digestive system.

To cook taro soup, one first peels the skin of taros and then cuts them. Next the taros are parboiled, rinsed in fresh water, and drained. Beef is cut into thin, long slices, which are then spiced and stir-fried. Water is added as soon as the beef slices turn a golden brown. After the beef soup is brought to a boil, kelp and taros are added, and the mixture is brought to a boil once again. The kelp pieces are taken out of the soup, sliced into round or rectangular pieces, and set aside to be added to the soup again just before serving. A head of leek is sliced and included in the soup, and, after seasoning, the soup is ready to serve.

Taro Soup

Taro Soup
Headword

토란국 ( 土卵- , Toranguk )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 8th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer YoonSookja(尹淑子)

Toranguk (Kor. 토란국, Chin. 土卵-, lit. taro soup) is a soup prepared by simmering taro stems in a beef broth made from brisket. Taro soup is a popular dish for Chuseok (Kor. 추석, Chin. 秋夕, Harvest Festival, the fifteenth of the eight lunar month), and can also be referred to as toran gomguk (Kor. 토란곰국). Based on a record in the literary anthology, “Dongguk Isanggukjip” (Kor. 동국이상국집, Chin. 東國李相國集, Collected Works of Minister Yi of the Eastern Kingdom) of the Goryeo period (918-1392), “taro soup was eaten in the countryside” and was already widespread in Korea already during the Goryeo dynasty.

Taro is a vegetable that is most nutritious and tasty around Chuseok. In Korean it is referred to as toran (Kor. 토란, Chin. 土卵, lit, eggs inside soil) or toryeon (Kor. 토련, Chin. 土蓮, lit. earth lotus), in reference to the shape of its leaves that resemble the broad leaves of the lotus. Taro is generally pre-treated before being added to broth. When added raw, it can give soup a greenish color or a slimy texture. Taro is usually boiled in salt water or water left over from rinsing rice. In oriental medicine, taro is an herbal ingredient that has a cooling effect on the intestines and stimulates the digestive system.

To cook taro soup, one first peels the skin of taros and then cuts them. Next the taros are parboiled, rinsed in fresh water, and drained. Beef is cut into thin, long slices, which are then spiced and stir-fried. Water is added as soon as the beef slices turn a golden brown. After the beef soup is brought to a boil, kelp and taros are added, and the mixture is brought to a boil once again. The kelp pieces are taken out of the soup, sliced into round or rectangular pieces, and set aside to be added to the soup again just before serving. A head of leek is sliced and included in the soup, and, after seasoning, the soup is ready to serve.