Lit. gourd union ceremony(合巹禮)

Lit. gourd union ceremony

Headword

합근례 ( 合巹禮 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Hollye

Writer ChoiWoonsik(崔雲植)

Bride and groom drinking liquor from the same cup to exchange marriage vows during a traditional wedding ceremony.

After finishing gyobaerye (Kor. 교배례, Chin. 交拜禮, lit. bow exchanging ceremony), the bride and groom sit down on their knees, and the attendants put down the liquor cup and the fruit dish from daeryesang (Kor. 대례상, Chin. 大禮床, lit. table for grand ceremony), chestnuts from the groom’s table and jujubes from the bride’s table, onto a small table, respectively. In hapgeullye, the bride and the groom exchange the liquor cup three times, in general. When each attendant pours liquor into the cups, the bride and the groom receive their own cups, then raise it to their lips and lower it to pour the liquor into an empty vessel. The attendant on the groom’s right side hangs on his wrist the red thread from the pine branch placed on daeryesang, and the attendant on the bride’s right side hangs on her wrist the blue thread from the bamboo branch to mark whose attendants they are when exchanging cups.

When they receive the cup from their respective attendants, the bride and groom raise the cups to their chests as an expression of wedding vows, then drink half of the liquor and return the cup to their attendants. The attendant receives the cup, and gives the cup from the groom to the bride and the cup from the bride to the groom. The bride and groom drink the remaining liquor and return the cup to the attendants, who in turn put the cups back into their original place. For the third cup, a pair of cups made from the halves of a calabash or round gourd is used. From the past, the gourd was considered sacred, as it was seen as a symbol of the productivity of the earth and a plant of fertility, of the source of life like the egg of a bird, and of the sun with mysterious power. On top of this, the other half of the gourd cup signified the one and only being in this world, hence the bride and groom’s drinking liquor from the gourd cup meant that the couple would value and love their one and only spouse in this world.

In hapgeullye, the bride and the groom exchange the liqour cup three times, and each time, the cup has its own significance: The first cup is meant to make vows to heaven and earth; the second cup is to make wedding vows to the spouse; and the third cup is to make promises to love and value each other and live in happy union as husband and wife till parted by death or grow old together (baengnyeonhaero, Kor. 백년해로, Chin. 百年偕老, lit. live one hundred years in happy union to grow old together). Drinking wine from the same cup, or hapgeullye, has the ritualistic nature of making wedding vows and promises to live in happy union until parted by death, using the medium of liquor that has never been absent from rituals since ancient times.

Lit. gourd union ceremony

Lit. gourd union ceremony
Headword

합근례 ( 合巹禮 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Hollye

Writer ChoiWoonsik(崔雲植)

Bride and groom drinking liquor from the same cup to exchange marriage vows during a traditional wedding ceremony.

After finishing gyobaerye (Kor. 교배례, Chin. 交拜禮, lit. bow exchanging ceremony), the bride and groom sit down on their knees, and the attendants put down the liquor cup and the fruit dish from daeryesang (Kor. 대례상, Chin. 大禮床, lit. table for grand ceremony), chestnuts from the groom’s table and jujubes from the bride’s table, onto a small table, respectively. In hapgeullye, the bride and the groom exchange the liquor cup three times, in general. When each attendant pours liquor into the cups, the bride and the groom receive their own cups, then raise it to their lips and lower it to pour the liquor into an empty vessel. The attendant on the groom’s right side hangs on his wrist the red thread from the pine branch placed on daeryesang, and the attendant on the bride’s right side hangs on her wrist the blue thread from the bamboo branch to mark whose attendants they are when exchanging cups.

When they receive the cup from their respective attendants, the bride and groom raise the cups to their chests as an expression of wedding vows, then drink half of the liquor and return the cup to their attendants. The attendant receives the cup, and gives the cup from the groom to the bride and the cup from the bride to the groom. The bride and groom drink the remaining liquor and return the cup to the attendants, who in turn put the cups back into their original place. For the third cup, a pair of cups made from the halves of a calabash or round gourd is used. From the past, the gourd was considered sacred, as it was seen as a symbol of the productivity of the earth and a plant of fertility, of the source of life like the egg of a bird, and of the sun with mysterious power. On top of this, the other half of the gourd cup signified the one and only being in this world, hence the bride and groom’s drinking liquor from the gourd cup meant that the couple would value and love their one and only spouse in this world.

In hapgeullye, the bride and the groom exchange the liqour cup three times, and each time, the cup has its own significance: The first cup is meant to make vows to heaven and earth; the second cup is to make wedding vows to the spouse; and the third cup is to make promises to love and value each other and live in happy union as husband and wife till parted by death or grow old together (baengnyeonhaero, Kor. 백년해로, Chin. 百年偕老, lit. live one hundred years in happy union to grow old together). Drinking wine from the same cup, or hapgeullye, has the ritualistic nature of making wedding vows and promises to live in happy union until parted by death, using the medium of liquor that has never been absent from rituals since ancient times.