Carrier of a wedding gift chest(背彩礼盒的人)

Carrier of a wedding gift chest

Headword

함진아비 ( 背彩礼盒的人 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Hollye

Writer JungYeonhak(鄭然鶴)

Carrier of a chest containing wedding gifts sent by the bridegroom’s family to the bride’s family before marriage.

Among the yungnye (Kor. 육례, Chin. 六禮, six steps of the marriage ceremony) found in “Saryepyeollam” (四禮便覽, Handbook of the Four Ceremonies), the procedure of napjing (Kor. 납징, Chin. 納徵), also called nappye (Kor. 납폐, Chin. 納幣, sending wedding presents from the groom’s family to the bride’s before the wedding), was related to sending the wedding chest. A record says, “Send a messenger to observe all the etiquettes of nappye.” Here the messenger refers to a steward or wedding chest carrier. The steward was a polite person selected from the groom’s relatives to prepare a marriage letter. The wedding chest carrier was selected from among blessed servants called boksu (Kor. 복수, Chin. 福手, lit. blessed hand), who received only traveling costs in return for carrying the chest.

These days, one of the groom’s friends carries the chest to the bride’s house or the groom carries it on his own to the bride’s home. Originally, however, the groom did not accompany the carrier of the wedding chest. The carrier was selected from among people of virtue and good reputation who had a son or sons. The carrier smeared his face with soot from the bottom of a cauldron as soot symbolized fire. In other words, soot was smeared on the face of the carrier to prevent evil spirits from befalling him by burning disasters and misfortunes as fire does. However, the custom of smearing the face with soot has now disappeared, and instead the carrier wears a dried squid with holes for the eyes and mouth, like a mask.

The carrier of the wedding chest should go straight to the bride’s family without putting the chest down on the way. Also, the carrier should arrive at the bride’s at yusi (Kor. 유시, Chin. 酉時, between five and seven o’clock in the afternoon), the time when yin and yang cross over. In recent years, however, the custom of selling and buying the wedding chest has emerged and in this process, both parties may hurt each other’s feelings. Also, the carrier’s arrival is delayed in most cases so that the chest enters the bride’s home after yusi.

The carrier performs an important mission in the marriage process as a messenger responsible for carrying the marriage letter and chaedan (Kor. 채단, Chin. 綵緞, lit. colorful silks).

Carrier of a wedding gift chest

Carrier of a wedding gift chest
Headword

함진아비 ( 背彩礼盒的人 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Hollye

Writer JungYeonhak(鄭然鶴)

Carrier of a chest containing wedding gifts sent by the bridegroom’s family to the bride’s family before marriage.

Among the yungnye (Kor. 육례, Chin. 六禮, six steps of the marriage ceremony) found in “Saryepyeollam” (四禮便覽, Handbook of the Four Ceremonies), the procedure of napjing (Kor. 납징, Chin. 納徵), also called nappye (Kor. 납폐, Chin. 納幣, sending wedding presents from the groom’s family to the bride’s before the wedding), was related to sending the wedding chest. A record says, “Send a messenger to observe all the etiquettes of nappye.” Here the messenger refers to a steward or wedding chest carrier. The steward was a polite person selected from the groom’s relatives to prepare a marriage letter. The wedding chest carrier was selected from among blessed servants called boksu (Kor. 복수, Chin. 福手, lit. blessed hand), who received only traveling costs in return for carrying the chest.

These days, one of the groom’s friends carries the chest to the bride’s house or the groom carries it on his own to the bride’s home. Originally, however, the groom did not accompany the carrier of the wedding chest. The carrier was selected from among people of virtue and good reputation who had a son or sons. The carrier smeared his face with soot from the bottom of a cauldron as soot symbolized fire. In other words, soot was smeared on the face of the carrier to prevent evil spirits from befalling him by burning disasters and misfortunes as fire does. However, the custom of smearing the face with soot has now disappeared, and instead the carrier wears a dried squid with holes for the eyes and mouth, like a mask.

The carrier of the wedding chest should go straight to the bride’s family without putting the chest down on the way. Also, the carrier should arrive at the bride’s at yusi (Kor. 유시, Chin. 酉時, between five and seven o’clock in the afternoon), the time when yin and yang cross over. In recent years, however, the custom of selling and buying the wedding chest has emerged and in this process, both parties may hurt each other’s feelings. Also, the carrier’s arrival is delayed in most cases so that the chest enters the bride’s home after yusi.

The carrier performs an important mission in the marriage process as a messenger responsible for carrying the marriage letter and chaedan (Kor. 채단, Chin. 綵緞, lit. colorful silks).