Chilseok Sacrificial Rite(七夕告祀)

Chilseok Sacrificial Rite

Headword

칠석고사 ( 七夕告祀 , Chilseok Gosa )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 7th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer LeeSooja(李秀子)

In the past on Chilseok, the festival held on the seventh of the seventh lunar month, Korean people performed sacrificial rites known as gosa (Kor. 고사, Chin. 告祀, sacrificial rite), Chilseok gosa (Kor. 칠석고사, Chin. 七夕告祀, lit. seventh evening sacrificial rite), Chilseok maji (Kor. 칠석맞이, Chin. 七夕-, lit. welcoming the seventh evening), Chilseok bulgong (Kor. 칠석불공, Chin. 七夕佛供, lit. offering to Buddha on the seventh evening), and Chilseong gosa (Kor. 칠성고사, Chin. 七星告祀, lit. sacrificial rite to seven stars).

An important characteristic of these rites is that they were usually commissioned by housewives. Chilseok gosa were performed in the morning or evening of Chilseok or on the eve of Chilseok, and could take a variety of forms. A housewife could offer a prayer at a Buddhist temple, sponsor a shamanistic ritual, or conduct a rite in the house or at the platform for jars of fermented foods. The most common ritual was to set a table with offerings at home and sit in front of it rubbing hands in a prayerful manner while addressing the gods with a prayer. Housewives usually asked for a long and healthy life, good needlework or weaving skills, peace and safety for their families and ancestral spirits, and good harvests. Buddhist followers brought offerings of rice, candles, incense or money to the temple and had the rite officiated by a priest. The food at the altar in these cases included cooked rice known as chilseongme (Kor. 칠성메, lit. rice for seven star spirits) and fruit.

Chilseok Sacrificial Rite

Chilseok Sacrificial Rite
Headword

칠석고사 ( 七夕告祀 , Chilseok Gosa )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 7th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer LeeSooja(李秀子)

In the past on Chilseok, the festival held on the seventh of the seventh lunar month, Korean people performed sacrificial rites known as gosa (Kor. 고사, Chin. 告祀, sacrificial rite), Chilseok gosa (Kor. 칠석고사, Chin. 七夕告祀, lit. seventh evening sacrificial rite), Chilseok maji (Kor. 칠석맞이, Chin. 七夕-, lit. welcoming the seventh evening), Chilseok bulgong (Kor. 칠석불공, Chin. 七夕佛供, lit. offering to Buddha on the seventh evening), and Chilseong gosa (Kor. 칠성고사, Chin. 七星告祀, lit. sacrificial rite to seven stars).

An important characteristic of these rites is that they were usually commissioned by housewives. Chilseok gosa were performed in the morning or evening of Chilseok or on the eve of Chilseok, and could take a variety of forms. A housewife could offer a prayer at a Buddhist temple, sponsor a shamanistic ritual, or conduct a rite in the house or at the platform for jars of fermented foods. The most common ritual was to set a table with offerings at home and sit in front of it rubbing hands in a prayerful manner while addressing the gods with a prayer. Housewives usually asked for a long and healthy life, good needlework or weaving skills, peace and safety for their families and ancestral spirits, and good harvests. Buddhist followers brought offerings of rice, candles, incense or money to the temple and had the rite officiated by a priest. The food at the altar in these cases included cooked rice known as chilseongme (Kor. 칠성메, lit. rice for seven star spirits) and fruit.