Chest of wedding gifts(函)

Chest of wedding gifts

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Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Hollye

Writer KimHyesook(金惠淑)

Chest used to bring honseoji (Kor. 혼서지, Chin. 婚書紙, marriage letter) and wedding gifts from the groom’s family to the bride’s in the marriage process.

The marriage process includes the sending of honsu (Kor. 혼수, household items required for marriage for the bride) and a chest containing a marriage letter and list of gifts from the groom’s family to the bride’s. On chohaeng (Kor. 초행, Chin. 初行, groom’s first visit to the bride’s home for the wedding ceremony), the groom takes this chest with him.

A marriage letter and wedding gifts are placed in the chest. Although wedding gifts vary depending on region and family situation, the groom’s family generally sends cloth of blue and red silk so that the bride can prepare wedding clothes. Or, in some regions, the groom’s family sends objects or jewelry symbolizing “man, ” such as walnuts or peppers as a token of wishes for a son.

The process of preparing the wedding chest or ham starts with laying paper (wood free paper) on the bottom of the box, then placing the marriage letter on the paper. Next, honsu or household items required for marriage are placed in the chest one by one, with cloth folded in alignment with the article: red cloth is first placed, then blue cloth is laid on the red cloth. Paper is laid on top of the cloths, then dried bush clover or sorghum stems are placed on the paper to prevent the items from getting mixed up before closing the chest. The chest is wrapped in a wrapping cloth, fitting over the four corners, then gathering the remaining cloth to completely bind the box. Around the knot of the cloth, a piece of paper is tied on featuring the two Chinese characters geunbong (Kor. 근봉, Chin. 謹封, lit. respectfully sealed). In the Jeju region, every family has a honsu chest to use on marriage occasions, so the bride’s family returns the chest to the groom’s afterwards. A family may borrow a chest from others if they cannot pepare one themselves.

Chest of wedding gifts

Chest of wedding gifts
Headword

( )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Hollye

Writer KimHyesook(金惠淑)

Chest used to bring honseoji (Kor. 혼서지, Chin. 婚書紙, marriage letter) and wedding gifts from the groom’s family to the bride’s in the marriage process.

The marriage process includes the sending of honsu (Kor. 혼수, household items required for marriage for the bride) and a chest containing a marriage letter and list of gifts from the groom’s family to the bride’s. On chohaeng (Kor. 초행, Chin. 初行, groom’s first visit to the bride’s home for the wedding ceremony), the groom takes this chest with him.

A marriage letter and wedding gifts are placed in the chest. Although wedding gifts vary depending on region and family situation, the groom’s family generally sends cloth of blue and red silk so that the bride can prepare wedding clothes. Or, in some regions, the groom’s family sends objects or jewelry symbolizing “man, ” such as walnuts or peppers as a token of wishes for a son.

The process of preparing the wedding chest or ham starts with laying paper (wood free paper) on the bottom of the box, then placing the marriage letter on the paper. Next, honsu or household items required for marriage are placed in the chest one by one, with cloth folded in alignment with the article: red cloth is first placed, then blue cloth is laid on the red cloth. Paper is laid on top of the cloths, then dried bush clover or sorghum stems are placed on the paper to prevent the items from getting mixed up before closing the chest. The chest is wrapped in a wrapping cloth, fitting over the four corners, then gathering the remaining cloth to completely bind the box. Around the knot of the cloth, a piece of paper is tied on featuring the two Chinese characters geunbong (Kor. 근봉, Chin. 謹封, lit. respectfully sealed). In the Jeju region, every family has a honsu chest to use on marriage occasions, so the bride’s family returns the chest to the groom’s afterwards. A family may borrow a chest from others if they cannot pepare one themselves.