Harvest Festival Dress(秋夕-)

Harvest Festival Dress

Headword

추석빔 ( 秋夕- , Chuseokbim )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 8th Lunar month > Clothing and Ornament

Writer LeeEunju(李恩珠)

Chuseokbim (Kor. 추석빔, Chin. 秋夕-) refers to the clothes and accessories worn on Chuseok (Kor. 추석, Chin. 秋夕, Harvest Festival, the fifteenth of the eighth lunar month). Koreans dress in a new or specially cleaned garment on this occasion as well as on other major traditional holidays. For example, the attire for Lunar New Year’s Day is referred to as seolbim (Kor. 설빔, New Year’s Dress) and the dress for Dano (Kor. 단오, Chin. 端午, Festival of the Fifth of the Fifth Lunar Month) is known as danojang (Kor. 단오장, Chin. 端午粧, Dano’s Dress). The origin of bim (Kor. 빔, sometimes pronounced as bieum (Kor. 비음)) stems from boim (Kor. 보임) or boem (Kor. 뵘), meaning “showing” or “appearance.”

There are social and climatic explanations for this custom. Just as with the Lunar New Year (Seollal or Seol, Kor. 설날 or 설), Chuseok marks a gateway point to a new temporal phase. On Chuseok people do not dress as ornately as they do to usher in the New Year, but it is customary on this day to don nice clothes that have a festive appearance when meeting relatives and neighbors. For the lower classes during the Joseon period (1392-1910), Chuseok provided a rare opportunity to acquire a new set of clothes. The custom also reflects practical considerations: Chuseok occurs in early autumn when there is a clear need to prepare warm clothes for winter.

In traditional society, children’s chuseokbim was no different from their seolbim, or New Year’s clothes. Records of the late 19th century documented that boys generally wore pants with a waistcoat or vest, and magoja (Kor. 마고자, quilted jacket) or durumagi (Kor. 두루마기, full-length coat). A headdress known as a bokgeon (Kor. 복건, Chin. 幅巾, conic hood-like head gear with a long draping tail in the back) completed the boys’ attire. Chuseok clothes for girls included a saekdong jeogori (Kor. 색동저고리, satin blouse with multicolor striped sleeves), red satin skirt, and a durumagi coat worn over them. There were different types of durumagi depending on the color and design, including saekdong durumagi (Kor. 색동두루마기), kkachi durumagi (Kor. 까치두루마기) and obangjang durumagi (Kor. 오방장두루마기).

Harvest Festival Dress

Harvest Festival Dress
Headword

추석빔 ( 秋夕- , Chuseokbim )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 8th Lunar month > Clothing and Ornament

Writer LeeEunju(李恩珠)

Chuseokbim (Kor. 추석빔, Chin. 秋夕-) refers to the clothes and accessories worn on Chuseok (Kor. 추석, Chin. 秋夕, Harvest Festival, the fifteenth of the eighth lunar month). Koreans dress in a new or specially cleaned garment on this occasion as well as on other major traditional holidays. For example, the attire for Lunar New Year’s Day is referred to as seolbim (Kor. 설빔, New Year’s Dress) and the dress for Dano (Kor. 단오, Chin. 端午, Festival of the Fifth of the Fifth Lunar Month) is known as danojang (Kor. 단오장, Chin. 端午粧, Dano’s Dress). The origin of bim (Kor. 빔, sometimes pronounced as bieum (Kor. 비음)) stems from boim (Kor. 보임) or boem (Kor. 뵘), meaning “showing” or “appearance.”

There are social and climatic explanations for this custom. Just as with the Lunar New Year (Seollal or Seol, Kor. 설날 or 설), Chuseok marks a gateway point to a new temporal phase. On Chuseok people do not dress as ornately as they do to usher in the New Year, but it is customary on this day to don nice clothes that have a festive appearance when meeting relatives and neighbors. For the lower classes during the Joseon period (1392-1910), Chuseok provided a rare opportunity to acquire a new set of clothes. The custom also reflects practical considerations: Chuseok occurs in early autumn when there is a clear need to prepare warm clothes for winter.

In traditional society, children’s chuseokbim was no different from their seolbim, or New Year’s clothes. Records of the late 19th century documented that boys generally wore pants with a waistcoat or vest, and magoja (Kor. 마고자, quilted jacket) or durumagi (Kor. 두루마기, full-length coat). A headdress known as a bokgeon (Kor. 복건, Chin. 幅巾, conic hood-like head gear with a long draping tail in the back) completed the boys’ attire. Chuseok clothes for girls included a saekdong jeogori (Kor. 색동저고리, satin blouse with multicolor striped sleeves), red satin skirt, and a durumagi coat worn over them. There were different types of durumagi depending on the color and design, including saekdong durumagi (Kor. 색동두루마기), kkachi durumagi (Kor. 까치두루마기) and obangjang durumagi (Kor. 오방장두루마기).