End of Summer Heat(處暑)

End of Summer Heat

Headword

처서 ( 處暑 , Cheoseo )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 7th Lunar month > Seasonal Terms

Writer JangJangsik(張長植)

Cheoseo (Kor. 처서, Chin. 處暑, lit. End of Heat) is the fourteenth of the twenty-four solar terms. It occurs between Ipchu (Kor. 입추, Chin. 立秋, Beginning of Fall) and Baengno (Kor. 백로, Chin. 白露, White Dew) and usually falls in the second half of the seventh lunar month. On the Gregorian calendar, Cheoseo falls around August twenty-third when the sun reaches the celestial longitude of 120°. As its name suggests, this solar term represents the end of the summer heat and the beginning of cooler autumn days.

Cheoseo generally occurs after the Homissisi (Kor. 호미씻이, Chin. 洗鋤宴, 洗鋤會, Hoe Washing) celebration on Baekjung (Kor. 백중, Chin. 百中, Buddhist All Soul’s Day, the fifteenth of the seventh lunar month). During this time farmers have a brief respite before they become busy again with the harvest. The weather around Cheoseo should be pleasant and the sun rays strong enough for the rice to mature fully. Concern about the weather and upcoming harvest leads farmers to exploit different kinds of divination methods that can supposedly predict the outcome of their farming. Accordingly, there are a lot of proverbs concerned with the relationship between the weather on Cheoseo and the future harvest. A popular proverb in Tongyeong, South Gyeongsang Province, for instance, states that "Rain on Cheoseo cuts down a thousand bags from the harvest; rain on Baengno, a hundred bags." Farmers in Buan and Cheongsan, North Jeolla Province used to say that "Rain on Cheoseo makes maidens cry."

End of Summer Heat

End of Summer Heat
Headword

처서 ( 處暑 , Cheoseo )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 7th Lunar month > Seasonal Terms

Writer JangJangsik(張長植)

Cheoseo (Kor. 처서, Chin. 處暑, lit. End of Heat) is the fourteenth of the twenty-four solar terms. It occurs between Ipchu (Kor. 입추, Chin. 立秋, Beginning of Fall) and Baengno (Kor. 백로, Chin. 白露, White Dew) and usually falls in the second half of the seventh lunar month. On the Gregorian calendar, Cheoseo falls around August twenty-third when the sun reaches the celestial longitude of 120°. As its name suggests, this solar term represents the end of the summer heat and the beginning of cooler autumn days.

Cheoseo generally occurs after the Homissisi (Kor. 호미씻이, Chin. 洗鋤宴, 洗鋤會, Hoe Washing) celebration on Baekjung (Kor. 백중, Chin. 百中, Buddhist All Soul’s Day, the fifteenth of the seventh lunar month). During this time farmers have a brief respite before they become busy again with the harvest. The weather around Cheoseo should be pleasant and the sun rays strong enough for the rice to mature fully. Concern about the weather and upcoming harvest leads farmers to exploit different kinds of divination methods that can supposedly predict the outcome of their farming. Accordingly, there are a lot of proverbs concerned with the relationship between the weather on Cheoseo and the future harvest. A popular proverb in Tongyeong, South Gyeongsang Province, for instance, states that "Rain on Cheoseo cuts down a thousand bags from the harvest; rain on Baengno, a hundred bags." Farmers in Buan and Cheongsan, North Jeolla Province used to say that "Rain on Cheoseo makes maidens cry."