Beginning of Fall(立秋)

Beginning of Fall

Headword

입추 ( 立秋 , Ipchu )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 7th Lunar month > Seasonal Terms

Writer ChoiWoonsik(崔雲植)

Ipchu (Kor. 입추, Chin. 立秋, lit. onset of fall) is the thirteenth of the twenty-four solar terms. It falls around August eighth on the Gregorian calendar when the sun reaches the celestial longitude of 120°. On the lunar calendar, this term is usually in the seventh month. Located between the solar terms of Daeseo (Kor. 대서, Chin. 大暑, Major Heat) and Cheoseo (Kor. 처서, Chin. 處暑, End of Heat), Ipchu is regarded as the end of summer and the beginning of fall, which lasts until Ipdong (Kor. 입동, Chin. 立冬, Beginning of Winter).

The continuous fine weather around Ipchu is an important condition for the maturation of rice and other crops. During the Joseon period (1392-1910), if it rained for over five days in this season, the government organized sacrificial rites in the capital and the area affected by rain with the purpose of asking the rain god to stop the rain. Farmers used to predict the harvest based on the weather on Ipchu. If it was clear, they believed that the harvest would be abundant; if the forecast called for heavy rain, it was seen as a sign of impending crop failure. Thunder on this day indicated a poor harvest of rice while an earthquake meant that cows and goats would be killed the following spring.

Around Ipchu evenings become cool and windy and farmers start preparing for the upcoming harvest season and winter. One of the most important tasks for farming households is planting cabbage and white radish that will be used for making kimchi to be consumed through the winter months.

Beginning of Fall

Beginning of Fall
Headword

입추 ( 立秋 , Ipchu )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 7th Lunar month > Seasonal Terms

Writer ChoiWoonsik(崔雲植)

Ipchu (Kor. 입추, Chin. 立秋, lit. onset of fall) is the thirteenth of the twenty-four solar terms. It falls around August eighth on the Gregorian calendar when the sun reaches the celestial longitude of 120°. On the lunar calendar, this term is usually in the seventh month. Located between the solar terms of Daeseo (Kor. 대서, Chin. 大暑, Major Heat) and Cheoseo (Kor. 처서, Chin. 處暑, End of Heat), Ipchu is regarded as the end of summer and the beginning of fall, which lasts until Ipdong (Kor. 입동, Chin. 立冬, Beginning of Winter).

The continuous fine weather around Ipchu is an important condition for the maturation of rice and other crops. During the Joseon period (1392-1910), if it rained for over five days in this season, the government organized sacrificial rites in the capital and the area affected by rain with the purpose of asking the rain god to stop the rain. Farmers used to predict the harvest based on the weather on Ipchu. If it was clear, they believed that the harvest would be abundant; if the forecast called for heavy rain, it was seen as a sign of impending crop failure. Thunder on this day indicated a poor harvest of rice while an earthquake meant that cows and goats would be killed the following spring.

Around Ipchu evenings become cool and windy and farmers start preparing for the upcoming harvest season and winter. One of the most important tasks for farming households is planting cabbage and white radish that will be used for making kimchi to be consumed through the winter months.