Yudu Noodles(流頭麵)

Yudu Noodles

Headword

유두면 ( 流頭麵 , Yudumyeon )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Summer > 6th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer JooYoungha(周永河)

Yudumyeon (Kor. 유두면, Chin. 流頭麵, lit. Yudu noodles) is a festival dish prepared to celebrate Yudu (Kor. 유두, Chin. 流頭, Water Festival of the sixth lunar month). One finds a record of consuming yudumyeon on the day of Yudu in the “Dongguk Sesigi” (Kor. 동국세시기, Chin. 東國歲時記, A Record of Seasonal Customs in Korea, 1849). The book also records that, “Yudumyeon are little balls of dough that often come in five colors. People put three balls on a string and carry or hang them on a door post to repel evil forces.”

In order to prepare Yudu noodles in five different colors, flour and water are mixed in five separate bowls, and an edible natural pigment is added to four of them. The most commonly used pigments are referred to as obangsaek (Kor. 오방색, Chin. 五方色, five colors of five cardinal directions) and are made of mugwort (blue), omija berry (red), gardenia berry (yellow) and sesame (black). The last color white is the natural color of the noodles. The dough is shaped into balls which are then cooked in boiling water.

Yudu Noodles

Yudu Noodles
Headword

유두면 ( 流頭麵 , Yudumyeon )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Summer > 6th Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer JooYoungha(周永河)

Yudumyeon (Kor. 유두면, Chin. 流頭麵, lit. Yudu noodles) is a festival dish prepared to celebrate Yudu (Kor. 유두, Chin. 流頭, Water Festival of the sixth lunar month). One finds a record of consuming yudumyeon on the day of Yudu in the “Dongguk Sesigi” (Kor. 동국세시기, Chin. 東國歲時記, A Record of Seasonal Customs in Korea, 1849). The book also records that, “Yudumyeon are little balls of dough that often come in five colors. People put three balls on a string and carry or hang them on a door post to repel evil forces.”

In order to prepare Yudu noodles in five different colors, flour and water are mixed in five separate bowls, and an edible natural pigment is added to four of them. The most commonly used pigments are referred to as obangsaek (Kor. 오방색, Chin. 五方色, five colors of five cardinal directions) and are made of mugwort (blue), omija berry (red), gardenia berry (yellow) and sesame (black). The last color white is the natural color of the noodles. The dough is shaped into balls which are then cooked in boiling water.