Namsadang Folk Show of Anseong(安城男寺黨風物-)

Namsadang Folk Show of Anseong

Headword

안성남사당풍물놀이 ( 安城男寺黨風物- , Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 9th Lunar month > Game

Writer KimHeonsun(金憲宣)

Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori (Kor. 안성남사당풍물놀이, Chin. 安城男寺黨風物-, Namsadang Folk Show of Anseong) refers to a tradition of folk music and dance performances preserved in the Anseong area of Gyeonggi Province. Pungmul nori (Kor. 풍물놀이, Chin. 風物-, folk music and dance performance) in traditional rural communities were usually performed by amateur bands of farmers. Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori is an exception as it was performed by the professional troupes of traveling entertainers who were based in the Anseong area. These troupes collected money from the audience and, along with pungmul nori, also performed pangut nori (Kor. 판굿놀이). The tradition continues to this day. In 1997, Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori was designated as Intangible Cultural Treasure of Gyeonggi Province, No. 21.

As with most other professional troupes, Anseong namsadangpae was affiliated with a temple. Cheongnyongsa Temple in Seoun-myeon, Anseong was an ideal base for travelling performers because it was located at the intersection of the most traveled roads in the area. The temple issued its resident performers certificates of endorsement, which they used as a token of accreditation when traveling to nearby towns and villages.

At the center of Anseong namsadangpae were usually four to five performers called tteunsoe (Kor. 뜬쇠) led by a chief performer, the kkoktusoe (Kor. 꼭두쇠). These were single men without family ties who sometimes offered sexual favors to villages to exchange for money. The troupe also had a group of apprentices known as ppiri (Kor. 삐리), who traveled with them in order to learn the trade. Anseong namsadangpae also included some additional members including the jeoseungpae (Kor. 저승패, older performers), and deungjimkkun (Kor. 등짐꾼, porters). The overall troupe could include forty to fifty men.

Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori was generally performed at harvest time. Although at the heart of these performances were folk music and dance, other namsadangpae routines were sometimes added to the repertoire, including beona (Kor. 버나, saucer spinning), salpan (Kor. 살판, floor acrobatics), eoreum (Kor. 어름, rope walking), deotboegi (Kor. 덧뵈기, mask dramas), or deolmi (Kor. 덜미, puppet plays). In its current form, Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori consists only of the folk music and dance segment, known as pungmul nori, and beona.

Namsadang Folk Show of Anseong

Namsadang Folk Show of Anseong
Headword

안성남사당풍물놀이 ( 安城男寺黨風物- , Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Autumn > 9th Lunar month > Game

Writer KimHeonsun(金憲宣)

Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori (Kor. 안성남사당풍물놀이, Chin. 安城男寺黨風物-, Namsadang Folk Show of Anseong) refers to a tradition of folk music and dance performances preserved in the Anseong area of Gyeonggi Province. Pungmul nori (Kor. 풍물놀이, Chin. 風物-, folk music and dance performance) in traditional rural communities were usually performed by amateur bands of farmers. Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori is an exception as it was performed by the professional troupes of traveling entertainers who were based in the Anseong area. These troupes collected money from the audience and, along with pungmul nori, also performed pangut nori (Kor. 판굿놀이). The tradition continues to this day. In 1997, Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori was designated as Intangible Cultural Treasure of Gyeonggi Province, No. 21.

As with most other professional troupes, Anseong namsadangpae was affiliated with a temple. Cheongnyongsa Temple in Seoun-myeon, Anseong was an ideal base for travelling performers because it was located at the intersection of the most traveled roads in the area. The temple issued its resident performers certificates of endorsement, which they used as a token of accreditation when traveling to nearby towns and villages.

At the center of Anseong namsadangpae were usually four to five performers called tteunsoe (Kor. 뜬쇠) led by a chief performer, the kkoktusoe (Kor. 꼭두쇠). These were single men without family ties who sometimes offered sexual favors to villages to exchange for money. The troupe also had a group of apprentices known as ppiri (Kor. 삐리), who traveled with them in order to learn the trade. Anseong namsadangpae also included some additional members including the jeoseungpae (Kor. 저승패, older performers), and deungjimkkun (Kor. 등짐꾼, porters). The overall troupe could include forty to fifty men.

Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori was generally performed at harvest time. Although at the heart of these performances were folk music and dance, other namsadangpae routines were sometimes added to the repertoire, including beona (Kor. 버나, saucer spinning), salpan (Kor. 살판, floor acrobatics), eoreum (Kor. 어름, rope walking), deotboegi (Kor. 덧뵈기, mask dramas), or deolmi (Kor. 덜미, puppet plays). In its current form, Anseong Namsadang Pungmul Nori consists only of the folk music and dance segment, known as pungmul nori, and beona.