Sledding(滑雪橇)

Sledding

Headword

썰매타기 ( 滑雪橇 , Sseolmae Tagi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Winter > 12th Lunar month > Game

Writer LeeChangsik(李昌植)

Sseolmae tagi (Kor. 썰매타기, lit. riding a sled) is one of the popular winter pastimes for Korean children, and is also known, depending on the region, as seoreumae (Kor. 서르매), sanseoreumae (Kor. 산서르매), or seolmae (Kor. 설매). As can be deduced from the Sino-Korean character-based names for the sled such as seolma (Kor. 설마, Chin. 雪馬) and seoreung (Kor. 설응, Chin. 雪鷹), the word sseolmae signifies gliding over snow swiftly like a horse or a hawk.

There are several different types of sleds, according to their intended use: freight sleds, passenger sleds (usually for children), and ski-like sleds worn on one’s feet. Freight sleds rest on curved blades with their front and rear tips bent upwards to facilitate the gliding movement. The deck is enclosed by thick wooden panels on the left and right sides. The width between the left and right-side panels is about two Korean feet ja (one ja is 30.3cm), and the bottom of the deck is made by joining six to seven wooden boards. The sled is pulled by a string tied to the outermost board at its head. A passenger sled is controlled with the help of a pair of ice picks, which are planted on the ice and used to pull the weight of the sled to move forward, change direction, or stop. People in snowy areas used sled-skis made from splitting large bamboo tubes into two halves and then bending them into an arched shape.

Sledding

Sledding
Headword

썰매타기 ( 滑雪橇 , Sseolmae Tagi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Winter > 12th Lunar month > Game

Writer LeeChangsik(李昌植)

Sseolmae tagi (Kor. 썰매타기, lit. riding a sled) is one of the popular winter pastimes for Korean children, and is also known, depending on the region, as seoreumae (Kor. 서르매), sanseoreumae (Kor. 산서르매), or seolmae (Kor. 설매). As can be deduced from the Sino-Korean character-based names for the sled such as seolma (Kor. 설마, Chin. 雪馬) and seoreung (Kor. 설응, Chin. 雪鷹), the word sseolmae signifies gliding over snow swiftly like a horse or a hawk.

There are several different types of sleds, according to their intended use: freight sleds, passenger sleds (usually for children), and ski-like sleds worn on one’s feet. Freight sleds rest on curved blades with their front and rear tips bent upwards to facilitate the gliding movement. The deck is enclosed by thick wooden panels on the left and right sides. The width between the left and right-side panels is about two Korean feet ja (one ja is 30.3cm), and the bottom of the deck is made by joining six to seven wooden boards. The sled is pulled by a string tied to the outermost board at its head. A passenger sled is controlled with the help of a pair of ice picks, which are planted on the ice and used to pull the weight of the sled to move forward, change direction, or stop. People in snowy areas used sled-skis made from splitting large bamboo tubes into two halves and then bending them into an arched shape.