Cinnamon Punch(水正果)

Headword

수정과 ( 水正果 , Sujeonggwa )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > January > 1st Lunarmonth > Seasonal Holidays

Writer LeeHyoji(李孝枝)

Cinnamon punch called sujeonggwa (Kor. 수정과, Chin. 水正果) is a Korean traditional beverage made from dried persimmons, cinnamon, and ginger and garnished with pine nuts. In the “Haedong Jukji” (Kor. 해동죽지, Chin. 海東竹枝, Bamboo Branches in Korea, 1925), the beverage is referred to as baekjeho (Kor. 백제호, Chin. 白醍醐, lit. white milky beverage) or baeksiseongho (Kor. 백시성호, Chin. 白柿醒醐, lit. white persimmon beverage) because of the white color of sugar crystallized on the surface of dried persimmons. The record explains that the drink "was made on New Year’s Day by the court ladies of Goryeo (918-1392) by boiling ginger, and then adding dried persimmons” and that “the tradition continued to be passed down to later generations, and now the drink is called sujeonggwa." There is also an old poem praising the beverage, describing it "As sweet as honey and as thick as milk, the sujeonggwa first served on an early spring platter; counting all the cups I have been served on every New Year’s Day, I have already had sixty-five of them”. The description above indicates that at least at the time of the writing of the “Haedong Jukji” (the late 19th century - early 20th century) the beverage was associated with the New Year celebrations. Today this popular drink is consumed on any day regardless of the season.

There are many different kinds of sujeonggwa. Garyeon sujeonggwa (Kor. 가련수정과, Chin. 加蓮水正果, lit. lotus cinnamon punch), for example, is made by adding starch-coated lotus petals to sweetened omija (Kor. 오미자, Chin. 五味子, five flavor berries) tea and garnishing it with pine nuts. The only remaining record of japgwa sujeonggwa (Kor. 잡과수정과, Chin. 雜果水正果, lit. cinnamon punch with miscellaneous fruits) is contained in the “Gunhak Hoedeung” (Kor. 군학회등, Chin. 群學會騰, Encyclopedia of Korean Traditional Cuisine, 1800), which states that it was a honey tea with pear and citron strips, garnished with pine nuts.

Cinnamon Punch

Cinnamon Punch
Headword

수정과 ( 水正果 , Sujeonggwa )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > January > 1st Lunarmonth > Seasonal Holidays

Writer LeeHyoji(李孝枝)

Cinnamon punch called sujeonggwa (Kor. 수정과, Chin. 水正果) is a Korean traditional beverage made from dried persimmons, cinnamon, and ginger and garnished with pine nuts. In the “Haedong Jukji” (Kor. 해동죽지, Chin. 海東竹枝, Bamboo Branches in Korea, 1925), the beverage is referred to as baekjeho (Kor. 백제호, Chin. 白醍醐, lit. white milky beverage) or baeksiseongho (Kor. 백시성호, Chin. 白柿醒醐, lit. white persimmon beverage) because of the white color of sugar crystallized on the surface of dried persimmons. The record explains that the drink "was made on New Year’s Day by the court ladies of Goryeo (918-1392) by boiling ginger, and then adding dried persimmons” and that “the tradition continued to be passed down to later generations, and now the drink is called sujeonggwa." There is also an old poem praising the beverage, describing it "As sweet as honey and as thick as milk, the sujeonggwa first served on an early spring platter; counting all the cups I have been served on every New Year’s Day, I have already had sixty-five of them”. The description above indicates that at least at the time of the writing of the “Haedong Jukji” (the late 19th century - early 20th century) the beverage was associated with the New Year celebrations. Today this popular drink is consumed on any day regardless of the season.

There are many different kinds of sujeonggwa. Garyeon sujeonggwa (Kor. 가련수정과, Chin. 加蓮水正果, lit. lotus cinnamon punch), for example, is made by adding starch-coated lotus petals to sweetened omija (Kor. 오미자, Chin. 五味子, five flavor berries) tea and garnishing it with pine nuts. The only remaining record of japgwa sujeonggwa (Kor. 잡과수정과, Chin. 雜果水正果, lit. cinnamon punch with miscellaneous fruits) is contained in the “Gunhak Hoedeung” (Kor. 군학회등, Chin. 群學會騰, Encyclopedia of Korean Traditional Cuisine, 1800), which states that it was a honey tea with pear and citron strips, garnished with pine nuts.