Feeding a Mountain(祭山)

Feeding a Mountain

Headword

산메기 ( 祭山 , Sanmegi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Spring > 3rd Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer KimJinsoon(金鎭順)

Sanmegi (Kor. 산메기, lit. feeding a mountain) is a ritual paying homage to a mountain by offering it food. It is mainly practiced in Gangwon Province and is based on the local kinship beliefs.

In this ritual, the mountain symbolizes not only the mountain spirits, but also the ancestors. Treating one’s ancestors well is traditionally regarded as a way to ensure the welfare of the descendants. Sanmegi sometimes is seen as a rite for cattle as it includes feeding a cow on mountain slopes. The ritual is still practiced in the eastern part of Gangwon Province, in places such as Jeongseon and Yeongwol. It is observed particularly vigorously in the Samcheok region where clan villages engage a shaman or a fortune-teller to preside over the ceremony. The ritual, combining tributes to ancestors with festivities, functions both as a religious practice and as an outdoor setting for a spring reunion of the clan members.

Feeding a Mountain

Feeding a Mountain
Headword

산메기 ( 祭山 , Sanmegi )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Spring > 3rd Lunar month > Seasonal Holidays

Writer KimJinsoon(金鎭順)

Sanmegi (Kor. 산메기, lit. feeding a mountain) is a ritual paying homage to a mountain by offering it food. It is mainly practiced in Gangwon Province and is based on the local kinship beliefs.

In this ritual, the mountain symbolizes not only the mountain spirits, but also the ancestors. Treating one’s ancestors well is traditionally regarded as a way to ensure the welfare of the descendants. Sanmegi sometimes is seen as a rite for cattle as it includes feeding a cow on mountain slopes. The ritual is still practiced in the eastern part of Gangwon Province, in places such as Jeongseon and Yeongwol. It is observed particularly vigorously in the Samcheok region where clan villages engage a shaman or a fortune-teller to preside over the ceremony. The ritual, combining tributes to ancestors with festivities, functions both as a religious practice and as an outdoor setting for a spring reunion of the clan members.