Fortune Pouch(福囊)

Fortune Pouch

Headword

복주머니 ( 福囊 , Bokjumeoni )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > January > 1st Lunarmonth > Seasonal Holidays

Writer GuMirae(具美來)

Bokjumeoni (Kor. 복주머니, Chin. 福囊, lit. fortune pouch) is a drawstring silk or cotton pouch embroidered with various auspicious symbols that are believed to bring fortune. Such pouches, according to their shape, can be classified into two groups; namely durujumeoni (Kor. 두루주머니, lit. round pouch) and gwijumeoni (Kor. 귀주머니, lit. pouch with ears). The embroidered patterns were largely inspired by Chinese characters with auspicious meanings, such as su (Chin. 壽, long life), bok (Chin. 福, fortune), bu (Chin. 富, wealth), gwi (Chin. 貴, nobility) and hui (Chin. 囍, joy). They can also depict animals and plants that are believed to be propitious, such as the Ten Creatures of Longevity, the herb of immortality, a bat, and chrysanthemums.

As traditional Korean clothes have no pockets, Korean people in the past needed a separate pouch, jumeoni, in which to carry their personal belongings. The "fortune pouch", however, was worn as a good luck charm rather than for practical purposes.

The pouch was a popular gift item for the first Pig Day (Kor. 상해일, Chin. 上亥日) or Rat Day (Kor. 상자일, Chin. 上子日) of the New Year, as it was believed that attaching it to one’s clothes on those days would help to expel evil forces and bring good luck for the entire year. One might regard it as a small gift by today’s standards but Korean people in the past cherished such pouches decorated with various auspicious designs as objects that would bring good fortune and happiness.

Fortune Pouch

Fortune Pouch
Headword

복주머니 ( 福囊 , Bokjumeoni )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > January > 1st Lunarmonth > Seasonal Holidays

Writer GuMirae(具美來)

Bokjumeoni (Kor. 복주머니, Chin. 福囊, lit. fortune pouch) is a drawstring silk or cotton pouch embroidered with various auspicious symbols that are believed to bring fortune. Such pouches, according to their shape, can be classified into two groups; namely durujumeoni (Kor. 두루주머니, lit. round pouch) and gwijumeoni (Kor. 귀주머니, lit. pouch with ears). The embroidered patterns were largely inspired by Chinese characters with auspicious meanings, such as su (Chin. 壽, long life), bok (Chin. 福, fortune), bu (Chin. 富, wealth), gwi (Chin. 貴, nobility) and hui (Chin. 囍, joy). They can also depict animals and plants that are believed to be propitious, such as the Ten Creatures of Longevity, the herb of immortality, a bat, and chrysanthemums.

As traditional Korean clothes have no pockets, Korean people in the past needed a separate pouch, jumeoni, in which to carry their personal belongings. The "fortune pouch", however, was worn as a good luck charm rather than for practical purposes.

The pouch was a popular gift item for the first Pig Day (Kor. 상해일, Chin. 上亥日) or Rat Day (Kor. 상자일, Chin. 上子日) of the New Year, as it was believed that attaching it to one’s clothes on those days would help to expel evil forces and bring good luck for the entire year. One might regard it as a small gift by today’s standards but Korean people in the past cherished such pouches decorated with various auspicious designs as objects that would bring good fortune and happiness.