Individual family ceremonies(家家禮)

Individual family ceremonies

Headword

가가례 ( 家家禮 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Jerye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Tradition by which the same rite or ceremony is performed in a different manner according to family, region or political faction.

The manner in which ceremonies or rites are performed is determined not so much by their fundamental nature but the order of a hierarchical society, propriety or environment of the ceremony or ritual surrounding the different elements constituting them. The rules and regulations were those provided by ritual literature. However, most of the texts, including “Jujagarye” (朱子家禮, Family Rituals of Zhu Xi), state only the basic rules, with no explanations for the detailed elements. This led to differences being generated according to the communities, regions, or political factions that performed the ceremonies or r ites. It is natural, therefore, that when a new or different situation occurred, it had to be dealt with by the community concerned, resulting in many different theories during the processes and rituals. The new theories were then developed into customs and traditions and, finally, became fully established as gagarye. The new rules of gagarye were not intended to govern any entire ceremony or ritual; rather, they were created to address certain specific areas not dealt with by the existing authoritative literature.

The most widely known examples of gagarye are related, first, with the subjects worshipped through family memorial rites; second, to the arrangement of food offerings; third, to the decision of whether or not the dead body is placed in a coffin before burial; fourth, the procedure of heonjak (Kor. 헌작, Chin. 獻酌, the offering of liquor); and fifth the procedure of gyebangae (Kor. 계반개, Chin. 啓飯蓋, opening the lid of the bowl offering cooked rice to the ancestral spirits during a rite). In addition, the tradition of gagarye provides rules for other numerous formalities related to wedding garments, funeral garments, delivery of wedding gifts, and so on. The Korean proverb, “Don’t argue about the persimmons or pears on another’s ritual table, ” clearly shows that there were many different versions of the procedures for family ceremonies.

Individual family ceremonies

Individual family ceremonies
Headword

가가례 ( 家家禮 )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Rites of Passage > Korean Rites of Passage > Jerye

Writer KimSiduk(金時德)

Tradition by which the same rite or ceremony is performed in a different manner according to family, region or political faction.

The manner in which ceremonies or rites are performed is determined not so much by their fundamental nature but the order of a hierarchical society, propriety or environment of the ceremony or ritual surrounding the different elements constituting them. The rules and regulations were those provided by ritual literature. However, most of the texts, including “Jujagarye” (朱子家禮, Family Rituals of Zhu Xi), state only the basic rules, with no explanations for the detailed elements. This led to differences being generated according to the communities, regions, or political factions that performed the ceremonies or r ites. It is natural, therefore, that when a new or different situation occurred, it had to be dealt with by the community concerned, resulting in many different theories during the processes and rituals. The new theories were then developed into customs and traditions and, finally, became fully established as gagarye. The new rules of gagarye were not intended to govern any entire ceremony or ritual; rather, they were created to address certain specific areas not dealt with by the existing authoritative literature.

The most widely known examples of gagarye are related, first, with the subjects worshipped through family memorial rites; second, to the arrangement of food offerings; third, to the decision of whether or not the dead body is placed in a coffin before burial; fourth, the procedure of heonjak (Kor. 헌작, Chin. 獻酌, the offering of liquor); and fifth the procedure of gyebangae (Kor. 계반개, Chin. 啓飯蓋, opening the lid of the bowl offering cooked rice to the ancestral spirits during a rite). In addition, the tradition of gagarye provides rules for other numerous formalities related to wedding garments, funeral garments, delivery of wedding gifts, and so on. The Korean proverb, “Don’t argue about the persimmons or pears on another’s ritual table, ” clearly shows that there were many different versions of the procedures for family ceremonies.