Rice from One Hundred Homes(百家飯)

Rice from One Hundred Homes

Headword

백가반 ( 百家飯 , Baekgaban )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > January > 1st Lunarmonth > Seasonal Holidays

Writer NaKyungsoo(羅景洙)

Baekgaban (Kor. 백가반, Chin. 百家飯, lit. rice from one hundred homes) is the custom of begging for and consuming the cooked rice from other households in one’s village. The practice was observed nationwide during the Great Full Moon Festival (the first full moon of the year, Jeongwol Daeboreum, Kor. 정월 대보름). Depending on region, baekgaban took place either in the morning or on the eve of the full moon day (the fifteenth of the first lunar month). Common people rarely used the word ‘baekgaban’ to designate this practice, and it was more popularly known as chetbap (Kor. 쳇밥, lit. sieve rice) or joribap (Kor. 조리밥, lit. bamboo strainer rice). These names were given to the practice in reference to the container in which the rice was put.

The term baekga (Kor. 백가, Chin. 百家, lit. one hundred homes) means “many homes”; the purpose of the activity was to obtain rice from as many households as possible. Begging for food is normally considered a demeaning act. However, this custom of begging, which has strong shamanistic roots, is intended as a holiday activity for children. The children would go around the village in groups and beg for five-grain rice (ogok-bap, Kor. 오곡밥) prepared especially for the festival. The children often carried a gourd dipper, sieve, strainer or a basket to carry the rice they collected. Eating the ogok-bap from several households was believed to make children healthy and stronger, and help them cope well with the summer heat. This rice was also attributed the power to prevent boils or other skin problems and help children weakened after protracted illnesses recover.

Rice from One Hundred Homes

Rice from One Hundred Homes
Headword

백가반 ( 百家飯 , Baekgaban )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > January > 1st Lunarmonth > Seasonal Holidays

Writer NaKyungsoo(羅景洙)

Baekgaban (Kor. 백가반, Chin. 百家飯, lit. rice from one hundred homes) is the custom of begging for and consuming the cooked rice from other households in one’s village. The practice was observed nationwide during the Great Full Moon Festival (the first full moon of the year, Jeongwol Daeboreum, Kor. 정월 대보름). Depending on region, baekgaban took place either in the morning or on the eve of the full moon day (the fifteenth of the first lunar month). Common people rarely used the word ‘baekgaban’ to designate this practice, and it was more popularly known as chetbap (Kor. 쳇밥, lit. sieve rice) or joribap (Kor. 조리밥, lit. bamboo strainer rice). These names were given to the practice in reference to the container in which the rice was put.

The term baekga (Kor. 백가, Chin. 百家, lit. one hundred homes) means “many homes”; the purpose of the activity was to obtain rice from as many households as possible. Begging for food is normally considered a demeaning act. However, this custom of begging, which has strong shamanistic roots, is intended as a holiday activity for children. The children would go around the village in groups and beg for five-grain rice (ogok-bap, Kor. 오곡밥) prepared especially for the festival. The children often carried a gourd dipper, sieve, strainer or a basket to carry the rice they collected. Eating the ogok-bap from several households was believed to make children healthy and stronger, and help them cope well with the summer heat. This rice was also attributed the power to prevent boils or other skin problems and help children weakened after protracted illnesses recover.