Dumpling Soup(饅頭-)

Dumpling Soup

Headword

만둣국 ( 饅頭- , Manduguk )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > January > 1st Lunarmonth > Seasonal Holidays

Writer JooYoungha(周永河)

Manduguk (Kor. 만두국) is a soup with dumplings made from various ingredients such as minced meat, tofu and vegetables that are wrapped in a thin dough. The food is known to have originated from China although Chinese dumplings are called jiaozi (Kor. 교자, Chin. 餃子) while mantou (a cognate to the Korean word mandu, Kor. 만두, Chin. 饅頭) refers to a steamed bun with no fillings. Korean dumplings are divided into several types according to the ingredients used for the filling and the wrapping; wheat mandu, buckwheat mandu, fish mandu, herring mandu, tofu mandu, etc. In the Joseon court (1392-1910), they also were called byeongsi (Kor. 병시, Chin, 餠匙, lit. rice cake spoon) because they were made in a spoon-like shape.

It is not known exactly when mandu was introduced to Korea. A poem titled "Inangga Johyang Mandu” (Kor. 이낭가조향만두, Chin. 二郞家朝餉饅頭, lit. I Tasted Mandu This Morning in My Second Son’s House) in the “Mogeun Seonsaeng Munjip” (Kor. 목은선생문집, Chin. 牧隱先生文集, Collected Literary Works by Master Mogeun), a book of writings by a late Goryeo scholar Yi Saek (1328-1396), reveals that the food was already widespread in Korea during the Goryeo period (918-1392). The book offers a detailed description of mandu: "It has a round shape and the color is that of snow. The inside is so full; it is like a well-ripe fruit." However, the description seems to refer to a dumpling with no filling similar to today’s steamed mandu, which is encased in thick dough.

Dumpling Soup

Dumpling Soup
Headword

만둣국 ( 饅頭- , Manduguk )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > January > 1st Lunarmonth > Seasonal Holidays

Writer JooYoungha(周永河)

Manduguk (Kor. 만두국) is a soup with dumplings made from various ingredients such as minced meat, tofu and vegetables that are wrapped in a thin dough. The food is known to have originated from China although Chinese dumplings are called jiaozi (Kor. 교자, Chin. 餃子) while mantou (a cognate to the Korean word mandu, Kor. 만두, Chin. 饅頭) refers to a steamed bun with no fillings. Korean dumplings are divided into several types according to the ingredients used for the filling and the wrapping; wheat mandu, buckwheat mandu, fish mandu, herring mandu, tofu mandu, etc. In the Joseon court (1392-1910), they also were called byeongsi (Kor. 병시, Chin, 餠匙, lit. rice cake spoon) because they were made in a spoon-like shape.

It is not known exactly when mandu was introduced to Korea. A poem titled "Inangga Johyang Mandu” (Kor. 이낭가조향만두, Chin. 二郞家朝餉饅頭, lit. I Tasted Mandu This Morning in My Second Son’s House) in the “Mogeun Seonsaeng Munjip” (Kor. 목은선생문집, Chin. 牧隱先生文集, Collected Literary Works by Master Mogeun), a book of writings by a late Goryeo scholar Yi Saek (1328-1396), reveals that the food was already widespread in Korea during the Goryeo period (918-1392). The book offers a detailed description of mandu: "It has a round shape and the color is that of snow. The inside is so full; it is like a well-ripe fruit." However, the description seems to refer to a dumpling with no filling similar to today’s steamed mandu, which is encased in thick dough.