Snow Blast(大雪)

Snow Blast

Headword

대설 ( 大雪 , Daeseol )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Winter > 11th Lunar month > Seasonal Terms

Writer LeeKwanho(李官浩)

Daeseol (Kor. 대설, Chin. 大雪, lit. big snow) is the twenty-first of the twenty-four solar terms; it follows Soseol (Kor. 소설, Chin. 小雪, First Snow), and precedes Dongji (Kor. 동지, Chin. 冬至, Winter Solstice). This day is supposed to be the time of the season’s largest snowfall. Although this may have been the case in the Heibei region of China where the traditional East Asian calendar system originated, the amount of snow is not necessarily greatest at this time on the Korean peninsula. Occurring sometime in the eleventh lunar month, Daeseol usually falls on December seventh or eighth on the Gregorian calendar, and corresponds to the time when the sun is at an ecliptic longitude of 255°.

The eleventh lunar month, also the time of the winter solstice, marks the transition point toward mid-winter and is the beginning of the off-season in farming communities. With their granaries filled with the fruits of their hard work, households do not need to worry about a lack of food and can afford to attend to other business, such as preparing for the New Year celebrations. In popular belief, large snow storm of Daeseol day is a harbinger of a warm winter. It seldom snows on this date and if it does, the amount is insignificant.

Snow Blast

Snow Blast
Headword

대설 ( 大雪 , Daeseol )

Location of the encyclopedia

Korean Seasonal Customs > Winter > 11th Lunar month > Seasonal Terms

Writer LeeKwanho(李官浩)

Daeseol (Kor. 대설, Chin. 大雪, lit. big snow) is the twenty-first of the twenty-four solar terms; it follows Soseol (Kor. 소설, Chin. 小雪, First Snow), and precedes Dongji (Kor. 동지, Chin. 冬至, Winter Solstice). This day is supposed to be the time of the season’s largest snowfall. Although this may have been the case in the Heibei region of China where the traditional East Asian calendar system originated, the amount of snow is not necessarily greatest at this time on the Korean peninsula. Occurring sometime in the eleventh lunar month, Daeseol usually falls on December seventh or eighth on the Gregorian calendar, and corresponds to the time when the sun is at an ecliptic longitude of 255°.

The eleventh lunar month, also the time of the winter solstice, marks the transition point toward mid-winter and is the beginning of the off-season in farming communities. With their granaries filled with the fruits of their hard work, households do not need to worry about a lack of food and can afford to attend to other business, such as preparing for the New Year celebrations. In popular belief, large snow storm of Daeseol day is a harbinger of a warm winter. It seldom snows on this date and if it does, the amount is insignificant.